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CanCigs Electronic Cigarettes Launches Brand New Wholesale Program for Canadian Retailers

[unable to retrieve full-text content]OTTAWA, Ontario, Canada, May 29, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Many electronic cigarette distributors across the globe are focusing on the wholesale market as more and more retailers begin to add electronic cigarettes to their current inventory. Electronic cigarettes are showing up on Mom...Original author: Margrett
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How the FDA plans to regulate e-cigarettes

By Quentin Fottrell Shutterstock.com / Leszek GlasnerThe FDA last month proposed new regulations to regulate e-cigarettes. It may want to pay special attention to the segment of the market known as “vaporizers.”As The Wall Street Journal points out, the fastest growing segment of the e-cigarette market is coming from customizable “vaporizers,’’ which have larger batteries and cartridges than regular e-cigarettes and can thus hold more liquid and last longer. They also allow users to refill cartridges with liquid bought in bulk. According to The Wall Street Journal article, Wells Fargo estimates vaporizers are growing twice as fast as regular e-cigarettes, approaching 50% of total e-cigarette sales.The FDA proposals — which also cover pipe tobacco, hookahs and cigars — will outlaw the sale of e-cigarettes to children and, like alcohol, require people to show identification to prove they are 18 years of age or older when they buy them. In the first such regulations for the e-cigarette industry, companies will also have to apply for FDA approval before marketing their products, which critics say vary wildly in quality; they also won’t be allowed to distribute free samples. The proposals will be open to public comment for 75 days and, experts say, will likely take at least a year to finalize.The FDA notes that e-cigarettes marketed with flavors “can be especially attractive to youth.” Earlier this month, a group of 11 Democratic members of Congress released a report that said e-cigarette flavors such as “Cherry Crush,” “Chocolate Treat” and “Peachy Keen” appeal to minors and should also be restricted. “From candy flavors to rock concert sponsorships, every single company surveyed in this report has employed a marketing strategy that appears to target youth,” Senator Richard J. Durbin, an Illinois Democrat, said in a statement. “E-cigarette makers are starting to prey on kids, just like the big tobacco companies,” added Henry J. Waxman, a Democrat from California.Click to Play E-cigarettes becoming regulated by FDAE-cigarettes now fall under the regulation of the FDA. What will the agency allow, and what will it not? And why not? How do e-cigarettes work? WSJ's Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer.Between 2011 and 2012, e-cigarette use nearly doubled from 0.6% to 1.1% among middle school students and from 1.5% to 2.8% among high school students, a 2013 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. Federal laws prohibit traditional cigarettes from being marketed to people under 18 years old, but there are no federal limits for e-cigarette makers. Roughly 28 states prohibit their sale to minors, and legislation is pending in several others. The Food and Drug Administration, meanwhile, has invited e-cigarette firms to cooperate with the agency on regulation. The FDA is also seeking research on whether e-cigarette users become dual users with traditional cigarettes.Unlike tobacco products, e-cigarettes carry no child-warning labels, but the FDA also proposes warnings related to packaging and advertisements. There’s been a “dramatic” increase in calls to poison centers related to e-cigarettes, according to a report released earlier this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The number of such calls rose from one a month in September 2010 to 215 a month in February 2014, the report said, while the number of calls each month involving conventional cigarettes did not show a similar increase during the same time period. “The liquid nicotine used in e-cigarettes can be hazardous,” CDC director Tom Frieden said in a statement.The American Lung Association, a non-profit organization in Washington, D.C., released a statement Thursday welcoming the FDA’s proposals, but urged the White House to finalize legislation by the end of the year. “The years of delay have allowed e-cigarette use among youth to double,” Harold Wimmer, national president and CEO of the American Lung Association, said in a statement, adding, “FDA must have basic authority over all tobacco products in order to protect public health and the health of our children.” He also urged the FDA to “regulate all tobacco products in the exact same manner.”One possible major blow for the e-cigarette industry: restrictions in advertising. “The e-cigarette industry does include historic big tobacco and has ripped some of its tactics from the tobacco industry’s playbook,” says Erika Sward, assistant vice president for national advocacy at the ALA, like glamorizing the product with celebrity endorsements that encourages people to switch to e-cigarettes rather than quitting nicotine. Recent e-cigarette commercials feature TV personality Jenny McCarthy and actor Stephen Dorff . Major tobacco companies Altria Group MO, Reynolds American RAI and Lorillard LO have all started producing e-cigarettes. The FDA has authority to issue further regulations to restrict online sales of all regulated tobacco products, an FDA spokesman says.Also see: 10 things e-cigarettes won’t tell youFor its part, the e-cigarette industry says it supports federal regulation — up to a point. The Smoke-Free Alternatives Trade Association, which represents the vapor products industry, backs proposals to restrict the sale of e-cigarette products to minors, and says it will support any effort made by legislative agencies and organizations to keep vaporizers out of the hands of underage consumers. But Cynthia Cabrera, executive director of the association, says e-cigarettes are markedly different from other tobacco products, and should not be classified as such. “These products do not contain tobacco, but may or may not contain nicotine derived from tobacco,” she says.Applying the Tobacco Control Act (2009) — which restricts the sale of tobacco cigarettes online and flavored cigarettes — in its totality to e-cigarettes would be a mistake, Cabrera says. “Big tobacco would inherit the space,” she says. “The majority of consumers switch from tobacco cigarettes because they have the opportunity to taste different flavors.” The industry should look at naming conventions, she adds. One e-cigarette company, Five Pawns, gives vapor flavors chess-inspired names like “Grandmaster” and “Queenside.” Flavors are an integral part of quitting and help people not return to smoking, says Carl V. Phillips, scientific director for The Consumer Advocates for Smoke-free Alternatives Association or CASAA.However, some studies maintain that vaporizers have carcinogenic properties, bolstering the case for the strictest possible regulation. Exposure to the nicotine vapor from e-cigarettes resulted in “strikingly similar” gene mutations in bronchial cells as those found in smokers, according to one study in January’s “ Clinical Cancer Research,” a journal published by the American Association for Cancer Research. Nicotine strength in e-cigarettes varies from zero to one or two packs of cigarettes in a single device, CASAA’s Phillips says. “You have however much you want and stop there,” he adds. Nicotine coupled with tobacco is far more dangerous than the “small amount” of nicotine in vaporizer products, Cabrera adds.And some experts say there’s not enough evidence to prove that e-cigarettes can cause cancer in people. “The world would be better off if nobody but scientists read studies like that,” says Phillips, who is also a former professor of public health at the University of Alberta, Canada. These are technical studies that should lead to further scientific analysis, he says, “which is eventually useful for what happens in the real world. Trying to take one of these laboratory events and translate it into policy is almost always a mistake.” A separate study published in “ BMC Public Health, ” published by BioMed Central, a scientific publisher in the U.K., found no evidence that e-cigarettes contain harmful contaminants.While e-cigarette makers contend that the rush to regulate the products could have a negative impact on an industry they regard as a healthier alternative to tobacco, the FDA has already found that e-cigarettes vary widely in reliability and quality, and didn’t always do what they said on the package. “The FDA found significant quality issues that indicate that quality control processes used to manufacture these products are substandard or nonexistent,” the agency’s consumer advice page states. Cartridges labeled “no nicotine” did contain nicotine, for instance, and three different e-cigarette cartridges with the same label emitted a markedly different amount of nicotine with each puff.This article has been updated from a previous version. Other articles by Quentin Fottrell:Diet soda may trim your lifespanCocaine use is going to potTreating hangovers is now a billion-dollar industryOriginal author: Cody
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E-Cigarette Legislation: Will the WHO lead us to better understanding of e-cigs?

In what could be a landmark moment for the electronic cigarette industry, 53 prominent health researchers have written to the World Health Organization (WHO) asking its members to “resist the urge to control and suppress e-cigarettes.”

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E-cigarettes could sweeten potential Reynolds-Lorillard deal

By Jilian Mincer NEW YORK (Reuters) - When Lorillard Inc bought the blu eCigs brand two years ago, the electronic cigarette had a 10 percent share of a tiny U.S. market, generating about $50 million in sales. It was available in only 12,000 retail outlets and over the Internet. Today, the U.S. tobacco company’s marketing and distribution muscle, including its use of frequent TV commercials and concert sponsorships, has taken blu into 149,000 outlets and driven its U.S. market share to about 47 percent. Annual sales have quadrupled to more than $200 million. The turbo-charged growth means that blu and Lorillard's British SKYCIG e-cigarette brand may be the assets with the sweetest potential for Reynolds American Inc as it holds talks over a deal to acquire its U.S. rival. Both brands would complement Reynolds' new Vuse e-cigarettes brand, due to go national this summer, and vault the combined company into an undisputed leadership position in the young market. And the gains in e-cigarette sales may have only just begun. Some Wall Street analysts see e-cigarettes and other “vapor products” overtaking traditional tobacco sales within six years. "Acquisition of Lorillard would give Reynolds a distinct advantage in the e-cig market," said Steve Marascia, Director of Research at Capitol Securities Management. Reuters reported last week that the companies were in late- stage talks that would combine the second and third-largest U.S. tobacco companies, according to people familiar with the matter. A combination of Lorillard and Reynolds, which is 42 percent owned by British American Tobacco, would create a formidable rival to Altria Group Inc, which owns the Marlboro brand and controls about 50 percent of the traditional cigarette market in the U.S. E-cigarettes are slim, reusable, metal tube devices containing nicotine-laced liquids that come in exotic flavors. When users puff, the nicotine is heated and released as a vapor containing no tar, unlike conventional cigarette smoke. Taking the lead position in e-cigarettes is appealing but given the market’s nascent nature, it is not a sure bet. New brands could easily grab market share, and there have been signs that other vaping products, including larger "tank"-based devices, may be gaining popularity. These products are typically less expensive to use, and can provide a stronger nicotine delivery. "I think it's more of a hedge," said Morningstar analyst Philip Gorham in reference to the e-cigarettes part of any Lorillard acquisition. "But if e-cigs take off, it will be the future, and they'll be glad they invested." MORE THAN MENTHOL Lorillard's popular Newport menthol cigarette brand, whose sales have held steady even as cigarette smoking in the United States has declined, is likely to be the immediate driver of any deal. Newport accounts for 37 percent of the U.S. menthol market and 12.5 percent of overall cigarette sales. U.S. sales of conventional cigarettes are forecast to drop to $15.3 billion in 2023 from $28.3 billion in 2013, according to a recent report from Wells Fargo Securities. In contrast, it sees revenue from e-cigarettes and other vapor devices growing to $24 billion by 2023 from $1.5 billion last year. Altria is also getting into the game, though it only introduced its MarkTen brand in August 2013 in Indiana. It plans a nationwide rollout next month. Lorillard bought blu two years ago from founder Jason Healy and his investors for $135 million. A year later, it paid $49 million for SKYCIG, now the leading e-cigarette in Britain. The deals were part of a strategy by Lorillard CEO Murray Kessler to expand its offerings beyond conventional cigarettes. Formerly at Altria, he helped build that company's Skoal and Copenhagen into two of the best-selling smokeless, or chewing tobacco, brands. Morningstar analyst Gorham estimates blu is currently worth $500 million to $1 billion, though it may account for a higher number in any deal for Lorillard, whose overall market value is currently about $22 billion. "Because Big Tobacco really wants a piece of the action, I could be low-balling it," he said. Since the vapor market is still in its early stages, it is difficult to anticipate how it may evolve. Regulatory changes could have a big impact. In April, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued proposed rules that would ban sale of e-cigarettes to anyone under 18 and require companies to list ingredients. But the rules so far would not restrict flavored products, online sales or advertising. The big tobacco companies are expected to be in a much better position than their dozens of smaller rivals to handle any new oversight thanks to their long experience dealing with regulators and battling anti-tobacco lawsuits. They may also have an upper hand in assuring quality control as the industry comes under stepped-up scrutiny after recent horror stories about the dangers of accidental poisoning from some ingredients on the market.   "The big three tobacco guys will be the big three e-cigarette companies because of their resources, relationship with distributors and ability to comply with the FDA faster than competitors," RBC Capital Markets LLC analyst Nik Modi said, referring to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (Reporting By Jilian Mincer; Editing by Martin Howell)Consumer DiscretionaryConsumer StaplesLorillard Incelectronic cigaretteReynolds American IncOriginal author: Halley
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E-cigarettes lose steam to vaporizers

Murray Kessler, Lorillard chief executive, told analysts during the company's April earnings call that the slowdown "is directly related to the rapid rise of vaporiser sales in vape shops".Read MoreBuzz kill: Feds lay down laws for e-cigarettesNik Modi, analyst at RBC Capital Markets, cited Google data showing US searches for "vape shop" have reached new highs every month this year, while queries for "electronic cigarette" have fallen back to 2009 levels. The pattern is similar in the UK, where e-cigarette sales are estimated at about £200m.Mr Kessler said vaporisers are growing faster than traditional e-cigarettes "because they deliver a superior consumer experience at a better value . . . bigger batteries, more vapour, more satisfaction, lower cost to refill".While new consumers may be comfortable starting with a traditional e-cigarette, those who stick with vaping may find the products are "somewhat lacking", said Andries Verleur, chief executive of VMR Products, which sells e-liquids, disposables and cartridge-based e-cigarettes.Read MorePassenger claims Air Canada let man 'vape' onboard"The large-scale devices solve this problem to an extent with the amount of liquid they can carry. You only need to charge and fill it once a week," Mr Verleur said.The ability to try a wide range of flavours and nicotine levels is also appealing, and liquids tend to be cheaper than e-cigarettes, widening the price gap with traditional cigarettes.Other market leaders have also taken notice. Njoy, backed by Sean Parker and Peter Thiel, has slipped from second to third place by US market share and said earlier this month it would add a refillable tank system to its product line-up in July and August. Mistic, another big brand, started selling a vaporiser in February.Read MoreIt's pot, it's smokeless—and it's publicly tradedAnalysts say such moves could push big tobacco to move more quickly into refillable systems. The two largest US cigarette makers, Altria and Reynolds American, are expanding their own cig-alike products nationally this year.Last month, Lorillard's Mr Kessler said the challenge is to "close the performance gap relative to vaporisers and do that in months, not years". The company is working on technical improvements, including battery strength, that he said "will minimise the defection from traditional e-cigs."Whether those changes will be enough to woo consumers is unclear. After a recent visit to a new vapour shop in New York, Ms Herzog wrote: "The cig-alike e-cigs as they are today are already becoming 'your father's e-cig'."—By Shannon Bond, Financial TimesOriginal author: Keitha
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Mouse, Rat & Cell Studies Don’t Make E-Cigarettes Carcinogenic

In determining what causes cancer in humans, epidemiologic and public health research is far superior to lab studies based on cells, mice or rats. While the latter can provide important information about the biology of cancer, the vast majority of carcinogens have been discovered in studies of human exposures. Although numerous epidemiologic studies prove that smokers are more likely to contract a variety of cancers, decades of research on cells and animals have failed to establish which of the thousands of toxins in cigarette smoke cause human lung, bladder or esophagus cancer. Of the two major components of e-cigarette juice, we know this: Nicotine, the subject of thousands of studies, has never been shown to be a cancer-causing agent, and propylene glycol is generally recognized as safe for human use by the FDA. Regrettably, these facts haven’t stopped some researchers from scaremongering about e-cigarettes. A study published in January (here) has led to a media frenzy suggesting that e-cigarette liquid may be as dangerous as smoke (here). This is nonsense. Normal cells do not live forever. But cancer cells are “immortalized” and are able to proliferate indefinitely. The experiments reported in this study were conducted in immortalized cell cultures, which also included mutations of two important genes: p53, an anticancer gene that is active in normal cells, was “silenced”; and k-ras, a well-characterized oncogene, was “activated.” The researchers were essentially using a cancer cell line. They measured the effect of two (unquantified) concentrations of nicotine e-cig solution and some sort of smoke extract on assays of growth and invasiveness after 10 days of exposure. Exposure of the cells to the low-nicotine e-cig solution and to the smoke extract had no effect on the invasiveness of the cells (a cancer trait). They reported, “We will next examine the effects of high nicotine conditioned media on cell invasion,” indicating a future experiment. The researchers noted that after 96 hours of exposure to e-cig solution, the cells showed changes in gene expression. This is not particularly newsworthy. Genes are the bits of DNA that tell cells what to do. At any given time cells have many thousands of active genes. Any environmental change can produce changes in the expression of large numbers of genes. In their effort to implicate nicotine, the researchers omitted information as to whether they had established appropriate experimental controls, such as exposure of the cells to other common agents such as caffeine or coffee extracts.Cellular and molecular research explores the incredibly complicated biology of cancer, but it is of limited value in identifying carcinogens. There are well established tests to determine if an agent is a possible mutagen, which is an indication that it might be cancer-causing. A 2007 study of American smokeless products was essentially negative (here), which is completely consistent with epidemiologic studies. It is likely that tests of e-cigarette liquids would produce similar results. Undistinguished research on smokeless tobacco products routinely generates headlines and soundbites best suited for the tabloids. From a public health standpoint, it is shameful that researchers and media conflate vague, exaggerated and highly theoretical claims about e-cigarette juice to the very real risks of cigarettes.Original author: James
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Call to Action! Rhode Island Bills Impose 80% Tax on E-Cigarettes and Unreasonable Requirements for Online Sales


Our mission is to ensure the availability of effective, affordable and reduced harm alternatives to smoking by increasing public awareness and education; to encourage the testing and development of products to achieve acceptable safety standards and reasonable regulation; and to promote the benefits of reduced harm alternatives.

Original author: Julie
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E-Cigarette Flavors: When will e-cig users be free to enjoy the tastes they desire?

This week, it was reported that the parent companies of brands such as Tootsie Roll, Thin Mints and Cinnamon Toast Crunch, among many others, are now presenting a fight to keep their names off e-cigarettes.

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E-cigarettes finding a North Jersey fan base in ex-tobacco users

As New Jersey mulls an e-cigarette tax and the medical community continues to stress the unknown health implications of so-called electronic vaping devices like e-cigarettes, a passionate community is growing in North Jersey – it’s a group of advocates largely made up of former smokers who say they quit traditional tobacco cigarettes when they started vaping.All about e-cigarettesWhat are e-cigarettes?E-cigarettes and other electronic vaping devices use a battery to heat up a liquid (known as e-juice or e-liquid) into a vapor to be inhaled by the user.What is in the liquid?It typically contains vegetable glycerin, propylene glycol or polyethylene glycol 400 and flavoring. The liquid can contain different percentages of nicotine or none at all.What kind of devices are there?E-cigarette: The basic product that looks almost like a longer cigarette and is made of a cartridge that holds the liquid and the battery.Box mod: This model, which looks almost like a pack of cigarettes with one sticking out, lets users vary the voltage, which changes the amount of vapor, flavor and “throat hit” from the device.Variable voltage mod, also known asrebuildable atomizer, e-pen or hookah pen: These produce the most vapor and often the most customizable options.How much does it cost?Prices vary as the business builds and companies continue to test the market to see what they charge. On average, though, a starter kit can cost as little as $15 and includes the battery, cartridge and charger for the cigarette. Device batteries are $10-$60. Many people carry multiple batteries with them. E-juice is as little as $5 for a 10 ml bottle. How long the juice or battery lasts depends on how much vaping someone does, but according to a employee at Flash Vapor in Little Falls, the 10 ml bottle seems to last most people two or three days.“This completely changed my life,” said 28-year-old Adam Jankowski of Garfield, who credits vaping for quitting his six-year cigarette habit in a week last spring.Tim Condron of Woodland Park smoked for 40 years and tried different cessation products without success. Last summer he picked up an e-cigarette just to see what it was like. Soon, the pack-a-day guy was down to a few traditional cigarettes a day. Within six months, he was done completely.Gary Remert, who smoked for 30 years, said e-cigarettes were “the only thing on the market” that worked for him and his wife in their many attempts to quit. He estimates they now save more than $600 a month not buying cigarettes.Joe Vilagos, who works at Flash Vapor in Little Falls where Condron and Remert are customers, started smoking when he was 10 years old and built to a four-pack-a-day habit. He started vaping about five years ago to “smoke” in the places he wasn’t allowed to use conventional cigarettes. A few months later, he had stopped smoking completely. Now, he says, he goes to the gym and can run around with his daughter without losing his breath – something he said would have been impossible before.All of these vaping North Jersey residents and customers believe in the safety of the product. At the very least, they believe their new habit is less harmful than their old one – and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seems to back that up.A February press release from the CDC said, “Although e-cigarettes appear to have far fewer of the toxins found in smoke compared to traditional cigarettes, the impact of e-cigarettes on long-term health must be studied.”Millions of people aren’t waiting for those long-term studies to be done. There are more than 3.5 million e-cigarette users in the United States, according to the Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association. E-cigarettes and their related vaping devices have become a big business with estimated U.S. sales between $1.5 billion and $2 billion last year, and the numbers continue to rise.While e-cigarettes may seem like a new invention, it’s the phenomenon that is the recent occurrence. The first smokeless, non-tobacco cigarette was patented in the 1960s. The modern e-cigarette, however, wasn’t developed until 2003 by a pharmacist in China. The product came to the United States in 2007 and has gained in popularity the last couple of years.When Shoaib Iqbal opened Good Guy Vapes in Paterson last May, he says he was the only store in North Jersey. The popularity and customer base caused him to quickly outgrow the small space. He then moved to the current Clifton location. Now he counts 10 dedicated vaping stores within 15 miles of him. E-cigarettes, e-juice and other products can be purchased online, at drugstores, convenience and grocery stores, and large retailers like Walmart.E-cigarettes don’t burn tobacco. Instead, a battery heats up liquid and turns it into a vapor. The e-juice comes in flavors like Peach Tea, Crème de la Crepe, PB&J, Hawaiian Punch, Mango, Pina Colada, Hot Cocoa and Banana Nut Bread, and can be had with varying percentages of nicotine or no nicotine at all.Those who take up vaping often find themselves becoming hobbyists. They meet at the stores, try different flavors of e-juice and check out the latest accessories and different models.Those who begin with the basic e-cigarette often graduate to personal atomizers, which they can customize and build the coil portion. They become advocates, as well, advising their smoker friends and preaching the positive attributes of the products.“There are very few people who have quit who have not become evangelical about e-cigarettes,” said Iqbal.Jankowski and other customers followed Iqbal from Paterson to Clifton and remained regulars. The employees tirelessly answer questions and share the passion for vaping. They not only know the regulars’ names and favorite flavors, but often their smoking backstory.Local stores have become like social clubs. Dan Villanueva, a store manager at Flash Vapor, said their store couches have become a place for former smokers to support one another similar to an AA meeting. They also discuss the latest in accessories, flavors and technology of their new, healthier (they hope) habit.Villanueva said the groups of customers, which are at their biggest on Friday and Saturday nights, end up making his job very easy. When traditional smokers come through the door, they are greeted by people who want to offer their testimony, tell them how to stop smoking.“It’s these people’s experience from quitting that actually sells,” he said.Condron said he brought his e-cigarette to his doctor to ask what she thought and was told she was all for it if it helped him quit smoking. Not all experts agree it’s the best approach for those trying to quit, however.“My message to patients is that the devices aren’t approved by the Food and Drug Administration and that, in fact, we do have seven FDA-approved medicines that do help people quit,” said Donna Richardson, clinical coordinator of the tobacco dependence program at Rutgers and an instructor at Rutgers School of Public Health. “If you are interested in quitting, please consider these. I will say also that we have a stop-smoking group at the cancer institute, many people who come to our group, use the electronic cigarette along with other medicines that we recommend.”BY KARA YORIOSTAFF WRITERTHE RECORD  E-cigarettes finding a North Jersey fan base in ex-tobacco usersOriginal author: Riley
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CDC is Lying to the Public by Classifying Electronic Cigarettes as "Tobacco Products"

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has officially classified electronic cigarettes as "tobacco products."In a November 14, 2013 press release, the CDC refers to electronic cigarettes as an "emerging tobacco product." The agency writes: "Emerging tobacco products such as e-cigarettes and hookahs are quickly gaining popularity among middle- and high-school students, according to a report in this week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report."In a November 15, 2013 MMWR article, the CDC refers to electronic cigarettes as a tobacco product. The article is entitled "Tobacco Product Use among Middle and High School Students -- United States, 2011 and 2012," and it describes the use of cigarettes, cigars, snus, dissolvable tobacco, and electronic cigarettes.In the November 15 article, the CDC redefines current tobacco use to include electronic cigarettes:"The 2012 NYTS used a three-stage cluster sampling procedure to generate a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of students in grades 6–12. This report includes 2011 and 2012 NYTS data to provide an updated definition of current tobacco use, which now also includes hookahs, snus, dissolvable tobacco, and electronic cigarettes, to take into account nonconventional products that are new to the market or are increasing in popularity; data for these four products were first collected in 2011."In its current fact sheet on youth and tobacco use, the CDC also classifies electronic cigarettes as tobacco products. The Rest of the StoryFrom a scientific perspective, the CDC's classification of electronic cigarettes as "tobacco products" is unacceptable. Electronic cigarettes are not tobacco products. They contain no tobacco!In fact, if the CDC is determined to classify electronic cigarettes as tobacco products, then they must also classify nicotine replacement products as "tobacco products," since NRT - like electronic cigarettes - have nothing to do with tobacco other than that the nicotine in it is derived from tobacco. However, there is no tobacco, per se, in NRT or in electronic cigarettes.While it is true that from a regulatory perspective, the FDA is classifying electronic cigarettes as tobacco products, this is the result of a detailed definition that is intended for regulatory purposes only. In the Tobacco Act, any substance that contains a chemical derived from tobacco is considered to be a tobacco product.However, from a scientific perspective, electronic cigarettes are clearly not tobacco products since they contain no tobacco.By referring to electronic cigarettes as "tobacco products" throughout its web site, including multiple press releases and MMWR articles, the CDC is effectively lying to the public about the nature of this product. The CDC is implying that e-cigarettes contain or are derived from tobacco, which is not true.Furthermore, the CDC has apparently deliberately chosen not to share with readers the truth: that electronic cigarettes are tobacco-free products. Nowhere in its press release or MMWR article does the CDC let readers know that in spite of its classification as a "tobacco product," e-cigarettes are not actually a tobacco product.As much as I think classifying electronic cigarettes as tobacco products in its surveys is inappropriate, at least I could have some respect for the agency if it were truthful and acknowledged to readers that these products do not contain any tobacco, and so should not be confused with real cigarettes. However, the CDC repeatedly fails to tell the public that electronic cigarettes contain no tobacco.In fact, the CDC appears to be afraid to acknowledge this truth to the public. I can find no place on its web site that the CDC informs the public of the critical information that e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco and hence are not tobacco products.This is a huge gift to the cigarette companies because by lying to the public about the true nature of electronic cigarettes, CDC is protecting the cigarette market from potential competition from non-tobacco electronic cigarettes.It is baffling to me why the CDC continues to wage a campaign of lies and deception. It is even more baffling why the CDC is lying for the purpose of protecting cigarette companies from competition from much safer, non-tobacco-containing products.Original author: Michael Siegel
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Seeing E-Cigarette Use Encourages Young Adult Tobacco Users to Light Up

Contact Information Available for logged-in reporters onlyCitations Tobacco ControlNewswise — Seeing people use electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) increases the urge to smoke among regular combustible cigarettes users, according to a new study of young adult smokers. This elevated desire is as strong as when observing someone smoking a regular cigarette, report scientists from the University of Chicago online, May 21, in Tobacco Control. The study is the first to investigate the behavioral effects of exposure to e-cigarette use in a controlled setting.“E-cigarette use has increased dramatically over the past few years, so observations and passive exposure will no doubt increase as well,” said study author Andrea King, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago. “It’s important to note that there could be effects of being in the company of an e-cigarette user, particularly for young smokers. For example, it’s possible that seeing e-cigarette use may promote more smoking behavior and less quitting.”E-cigarettes deliver nicotine via a heated solution of compounds and flavorings. This vapor is inhaled by users and closely resembles the smoke released by combustible cigarettes. Researchers have looked at the health effects of e-cigarette vapor, but no studies have been conducted on the visual effects of e-cigarette use.To investigate, King and her team recruited 60 young adult smokers. Participants in the study were told they were being tested on their responses to a variety of social interactions. They were paired with an actor, pretending to be a participant, who would smoke an e-cigarette or a regular cigarette during a conversation. The actual study subjects were measured for their urge to smoke at multiple points before and after this interaction.The team found that seeing e-cigarette use significantly increased the observer’s desire to smoke both regular and e-cigarettes. The increases in desire to smoke a regular cigarette after observing e-cigarette use were as strong as after observing regular cigarette use. However, observing regular cigarette use did not increase participants’ desire to smoke an e-cigarette. As a control, actors also drank from a bottle of water while engaging in conversation with the participant to mimick hand-to-mouth behavior. No increase in desire for either regular or e-cigarettes were seen in this scenario.“Whether participants were exposed to someone smoking a combustible or an e-cigarette, the urge to smoke a combustible cigarette was just as high in either condition,” King said. “We know from past research that seeing regular cigarette use is a potent cue for someone to want to smoke. We did not know if seeing e-cigarette use would produce the same effect. But that is exactly what we found. When we re-tested participants 20 minutes after exposure, the desire to smoke remained elevated.”With increasing e-cigarette sales nationwide, King believes that more attention needs to be placed not only on the health ramifications for users, but on the secondary, passive effects on observers.“This study was our first investigation, and there are still many unanswered questions. We don’t know about the effects on a non-smoker or a person who has quit smoking or if responses are different for the various e-cigarette brands,” she said. “But if the results do generalize and we show this in other groups, it’s important to consider policy going forward in terms of reducing harm for both users and observers of e-cigarettes.”##The study, “Passive exposure to electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use increases desire for combustible and e-cigarettes in young adult smokers,” was funded by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Additional authors include Lia Smith, Patrick McNamara, Alicia K Matthews and Daniel Fridberg.Comment/ShareOriginal author: Leanora
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E-Cigarettes: China’s Next Growth Industry

Amidst the growing global regulation on tobacco use and rising public awareness about the hazards of smoking, e-cigarettes are becoming a new, emerging industry. Invented by a Chinese medical researcher about one decade ago, electronic cigarettes are battery powered devices that allow users simulate smoking by vaporizing liquid nicotine (among other additives), but in fact have no tobacco. Since being first released on the consumer market in 2005, the global e-cigarette market has been growing rapidly. In the United States, e-cigarette sales have grown at an annual rate of 115 percent in the 2009-12 period. It is estimated that global e-cigarette market could increase to $10 billion by 2017 . Some analysts even predict that e-cigarette use will eclipse that of combustible cigarettes in ten years. Over 95 percent of the e-cigarettes worldwide are produced in one place: Shenzhen, China.What are the implications of the growing global e-cigarette market for tobacco use in China, the world’s largest producer and consumer of tobacco products? As it’s been covered here and elsewhere, one of the biggest public health problems in China is the widespread tobacco use. About 1.2 million people die annually as a result of tobacco-related illnesses in the country. But e-cigarette use remains a very small portion of China’s $200-billion-dollar cigarette business . Combustible cigarettes are still widely popular and readily available. Lack of market regulation and the low barriers to market entry result in fierce competition and shrinking profit margin. And despite the advertisements, e-cigarettes have not been completely safe.E-cigarettes are not yet popular in China , but the market potential for e-cigarettes is huge. If only 1 percent of China’s smoking population turned to e-cigarettes, it would mean a market of about 3.5 million e-cigarette users. In April, China banned Party and government officials from smoking in public places or during official activities. The tremendous challenges that China faces in enforcing the ban may encourage more officials to turn to e-cigarettes as an alternative, which in turn could create powerful “demonstration effect” for the ordinary people to follow suit. Furthermore, because e-cigarettes’ smoke less harmful, it is believed that this will significantly lower the health risk caused by second-hand smoke in China . As many as 740 million are regularly exposed to second-hand smoke, including 180 million under the age of 15. Finally, many of the safety risk and health problems associated with e-cigarettes are likely caused by the non-uniformity and inconsistent quality of the products (i.e., people tend to buy cheap, low-quality e-cigarettes) rather than the products themselves. In August, about 500 representatives of the global e-cigarette industry will meet in Shenzhen to unveil new technologies and discuss how to improve safety and health standards industry-wide.Global trends suggest that e-cigarette use will grow and be here to stay while supplanting regular cigarettes. This will be no different for China.Original author: Neville
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Liquid nicotine companies peddling notable brands like Tootsie Roll

;A person poses with an electronic cigarette, or e-cigarette.(AP Photo / Tim Ireland, PA)RICHMOND, Va. – Owners of brands geared toward children of all ages are battling to keep notable names like Thin Mint, Tootsie Roll and Cinnamon Toast Crunch off the flavoured nicotine used in electronic cigarettes.Story continues belowGeneral Mills Inc., the Girl Scouts of the USA and Tootsie Roll Industries Inc. are among several companies that have sent cease-and-desist letters to makers of the liquid nicotine demanding they stop using the brands and may take further legal action if necessary. They want to make sure their brands aren’t being used to sell an addictive drug or make it appealing to to children.The actions highlight the debate about the array of flavours available for the battery-powered devices that heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapour that users inhale. The Food and Drug Administration last month proposed regulating electronic cigarettes but didn’t immediately ban on fruit or candy flavours, which are barred for use in regular cigarettes because of the worry that the flavours are used to appeal to children.READ MORE: Are e-cigarette poisonings on the rise in Canada?It’s growing pains for the industry that reached nearly $2 billion in sales last year in the face of looming regulation. E-cigarette users say the devices address both the addictive and behavioural aspects of smoking without the thousands of chemicals found in regular cigarettes.There are about 1,500 e-liquid makers in the U.S. and countless others abroad selling vials of nicotine from traditional tobacco to cherry cola on the Internet and in retail stores, often featuring photos of the popular treats. Using the brand name like Thin Mint or Fireball conjures up a very specific flavour in buyers’ minds, in a way that just “mint chocolate” or “cinnamon” doesn’t.“Using the Thin Mint name – which is synonymous with Girl Scouts and everything we do to enrich the lives of girls – to market e-cigarettes to youth is deceitful and shameless,” Girl Scouts spokeswoman Kelly Parisi said in a statement.The issue of illegally using well-known brands on e-cigarette products isn’t new for some. For a couple of years, cigarette makers R.J. Reynolds Tobacco and Philip Morris USA have fought legal battles with websites selling e-cigarette liquid capitalizing on their Camel and Marlboro brand names and imagery. The companies have since released their own e-cigarettes but without using their top-selling brand names.READ MORE: U.S. officials want to regulate e-cigarettes – is Canada following?“It’s the age-old problem with an emerging market,” said Linc Williams, board member of the American E-liquid Manufacturing Standards Association and an executive at NicVape Inc., which produces liquid nicotine. “As companies goes through their maturity process of going from being a wild entrepreneur to starting to establish real corporate ethics and product stewardship, it’s something that we’re going to continue to see.”Williams said his company is renaming many of its liquids to names that won’t be associated with well-known brands. Some companies demanded NicVape stop using brand names such as Junior Mints on their liquid nicotine. In other cases, the company is taking proactive steps to removing imagery and names like gummy bear that could be appealing to children.“Unfortunately it’s not going to change unless companies come in and assert their intellectual property,” he said.And that’s what companies are starting to do more often as the industry has rocketed from thousands of users in 2006 to several million worldwide, bringing the issue to the forefront.READ MORE: How will new U.S. rules change e-cigarette business?“We’re family oriented. A lot of kids eat our products, we have many adults also, but our big concern is we have to protect the trademark,” said Ellen Gordon, president and chief operating officer of Tootsie Roll Industries Inc. “When you have well-known trademarks, one of your responsibilities is to protect (them) because it’s been such a big investment over the years.”—Michael Felberbaum can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/MLFelberbaum.Report an errorOriginal author: Gwen
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CASAA comments on deeming re Paperwork Reduction Act


by Carl V Phillips Sorry for the lack of posts recently.  I have been busy.  One of the things I was busy with was those comments, which you can find here at the main CASAA blog.  It is something that … Continue reading →Original author: Carl V Phillips
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CASAA's Comment to OMB/OIRA regarding Paperwork Reduction Act and FDA Deeming Regulation

To:      Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs

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Sweets makers work to keep names off e-cigarettes

RICHMOND, Va. --Owners of brands geared toward children of all ages are battling to keep notable names like Thin Mint, Tootsie Roll and Cinnamon Toast Crunch off the flavored nicotine used in electronic cigarettes.Now the owners of those trademarks are fighting back to make sure their brands aren't being used to sell an addictive drug or make it appealing to to children.General Mills Inc., the Girl Scouts of the USA and Tootsie Roll Industries Inc. are among several companies that have sent cease-and-desist letters to makers of the liquid nicotine demanding they stop using the brands and may take further legal action if necessary.The actions highlight the debate about the array of flavors available for the battery-powered devices that heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapor that users inhale. The Food and Drug Administration last month proposed regulating electronic cigarettes but didn't immediately ban on fruit or candy flavors, which are barred for use in regular cigarettes because of the worry that the flavors are used to appeal to children.It's growing pains for the industry that reached nearly $2 billion in sales last year in the face of looming regulation. E-cigarette users say the devices address both the addictive and behavioral aspects of smoking without the thousands of chemicals found in regular cigarettes.There are about 1,500 e-liquid makers in the U.S. and countless others abroad selling vials of nicotine from traditional tobacco to cherry cola on the Internet and in retail stores, often featuring photos of the popular treats. Using the brand name like Thin Mint or Fireball conjures up a very specific flavor in buyers' minds, in a way that just "mint chocolate" or "cinnamon" doesn't."Using the Thin Mint name - which is synonymous with Girl Scouts and everything we do to enrich the lives of girls - to market e-cigarettes to youth is deceitful and shameless," Girl Scouts spokeswoman Kelly Parisi said in a statement.The issue of illegally using well-known brands on e-cigarette products isn't new for some. For a couple of years, cigarette makers R.J. Reynolds Tobacco and Philip Morris USA have fought legal battles with websites selling e-cigarette liquid capitalizing on their Camel and Marlboro brand names and imagery. The companies have since released their own e-cigarettes but without using their top-selling brand names."It's the age-old problem with an emerging market," said Linc Williams, board member of the American E-liquid Manufacturing Standards Association and an executive at NicVape Inc., which produces liquid nicotine. "As companies goes through their maturity process of going from being a wild entrepreneur to starting to establish real corporate ethics and product stewardship, it's something that we're going to continue to see."Williams said his company is renaming many of its liquids to names that won't be associated with well-known brands. Some companies demanded NicVape stop using brand names such as Junior Mints on their liquid nicotine. In other cases, the company is taking proactive steps to removing imagery and names like gummy bear that could be appealing to children."Unfortunately it's not going to change unless companies come in and assert their intellectual property," he said.And that's what companies are starting to do more often as the industry has rocketed from thousands of users in 2006 to several million worldwide, bringing the issue to the forefront."We're family oriented. A lot of kids eat our products, we have many adults also, but our big concern is we have to protect the trademark," said Ellen Gordon, president and chief operating officer of Tootsie Roll Industries Inc. "When you have well-known trademarks, one of your responsibilities is to protect (them) because it's been such a big investment over the years."Original author: Keitha
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Sweets Makers Want Names Off E-Cigarettes

Richmond, Va. — Owners of brands geared toward children of all ages are battling to keep notable names like Thin Mint, Tootsie Roll and Cinnamon Toast Crunch off the flavored nicotine used in electronic cigarettes.Now the owners of those trademarks are fighting back to make sure their brands aren’t being used to sell an addictive drug or make it appealing to to children.General Mills Inc., the Girl Scouts of the USA and Tootsie Roll Industries Inc. are among several companies that have sent cease-and-desist letters to makers of the liquid nicotine demanding they stop using the brands and may take further legal action if necessary.The actions highlight the debate about the array of flavors available for the battery-powered devices that heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapor that users inhale. The Food and Drug Administration last month proposed regulating electronic cigarettes but didn’t immediately ban on fruit or candy flavors, which are barred for use in regular cigarettes because of the worry that the flavors are used to appeal to children.It’s growing pains for the industry that reached nearly $2 billion in sales last year in the face of looming regulation. E-cigarette users say the devices address both the addictive and behavioral aspects of smoking without the thousands of chemicals found in regular cigarettes.There are about 1,500 e-liquid makers in the U.S. and countless others abroad selling vials of nicotine from traditional tobacco to cherry cola on the Internet and in retail stores, often featuring photos of the popular treats. Using the brand name like Thin Mint or Fireball conjures up a very specific flavor in buyers’ minds, in a way that just “mint chocolate” or “cinnamon” doesn’t.“Using the Thin Mint name — which is synonymous with Girl Scouts and everything we do to enrich the lives of girls — to market e-cigarettes to youth is deceitful and shameless,” Girl Scouts spokeswoman Kelly Parisi said in a statement.The issue of illegally using well-known brands on e-cigarette products isn’t new for some. For a couple of years, cigarette makers R.J. Reynolds Tobacco and Philip Morris USA have fought legal battles with websites selling e-cigarette liquid capitalizing on their Camel and Marlboro brand names and imagery. The companies have since released their own e-cigarettes but without using their top-selling brand names.“It’s the age-old problem with an emerging market,” said Linc Williams, board member of the American E-liquid Manufacturing Standards Association and an executive at NicVape Inc., which produces liquid nicotine. “As companies goes through their maturity process of going from being a wild entrepreneur to starting to establish real corporate ethics and product stewardship, it’s something that we’re going to continue to see.”Williams said his company is renaming many of its liquids to names that won’t be associated with well-known brands. Some companies demanded NicVape stop using brand names such as Junior Mints on their liquid nicotine. In other cases, the company is taking proactive steps to removing imagery and names like gummy bear that could be appealing to children.“Unfortunately it’s not going to change unless companies come in and assert their intellectual property,” he said.And that’s what companies are starting to do more often as the industry has rocketed from thousands of users in 2006 to several million worldwide, bringing the issue to the forefront.“We’re family oriented. A lot of kids eat our products, we have many adults also, but our big concern is we have to protect the trademark,” said Ellen Gordon, president and chief operating officer of Tootsie Roll Industries Inc. “When you have well-known trademarks, one of your responsibilities is to protect (them) because it’s been such a big investment over the years.”Original author: Margrett
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E-cigarette production pushed to China from U.S. due to proposed federal regulations

Some of the leading U.S. producers of electronic cigarettes are moving their manufacturing to the United States from China in response to growing concern about quality and the prospect of tighter federal regulations.In recent weeks, some of the best-selling U.S. e-cigarette companies, including closely held Mistic and White Cloud, announced that they would move production to new, highly automated U.S. factories that would enable them to track ingredients and quality more closely. As a fringe benefit, they even expect costs to be lower than in China, the country that invented the battery-powered cartridges that produce a nicotine-laced inhalable vapor."People are concerned about quality," said Bonnie Herzog, a senior analyst at Wells Fargo Securities, who expects more manufacturing to shift to the United States."There is varying quality among all these different brands," she said. "I think regulation will standardize these products because they will be forced to improve."The shift has gained momentum since April, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed rules that would require, among other things, manufacturers that want access to the U.S. market to register with the agency and list the ingredients in their products."As a general rule, the FDA regulation will require more control over the manufacturing process," said Bryan Haynes, an attorney at Troutman Sanders, a law firm in Richmond, Virginia, that represents e-cigarette companies. He said more companies plan to move production to the United States because it "could make compliance easier."Many of these companies already produce the nicotine-laced liquid used in e-cigarettes in the United States and then ship it to China, where the battery-powered devices are assembled. Most batteries will continue to be made in China.E-cigarettes are considered a crucial business for the three major U.S. tobacco companies, which have bought or developed their own brands in recent years to offset shrinking sales of conventional tobacco cigarettes. Compliance with new U.S. regulations has become a top priority.U.S. sales of e-cigarettes are expected to outpace sales of tobacco cigarettes by 2020, in part because of the perception they are safer to smoke.Their advocates say e-cigarettes are a safer alternative to smoking traditional cigarettes since they do not produce lung-destroying tar. But there is little data about the long-term health effects of the products.Reynolds American Inc (RAI.N) is the only one of the nation's three largest tobacco companies to make its e-cigarettes in the United States, at a factory in Kansas. It currently sells its Vuse brand in two states but expects to expand nationwide this summer.Lorillard Inc's (LO.N) blu brand is assembled in China but the liquid is produced in the United States. Reuters reported earlier this week that Reynolds was in active discussions to buy Lorillard. Blu is the top selling e-cigarette brand in the country, with about half of the market share.Altria Group Inc (MO.N) makes the liquid for its MarkTen in Richmond, Virginia, and manufactures the brand in China. It also expects to sell the e-cigarettes across the United States this summer.To be sure, most e-cigarettes are still made in China. Many companies are pleased with production in China and have no plans to move their operations. NJOY, for example, produces the liquid for its NJOY brand in the United States and assembles the devices in China."We adhere to our own 'gold standard,' which covers quality control practices and tests of every NJOY product," Craig Weiss, the company's chief executive, said in an email.In May, Tarpon Springs, Florida-based White Cloud said it would move manufacturing to an automated plant in the United States that would make production much faster and more precise."We can delivery a much more uniform product because we're not reliant on someone's eye," said Rob Burton, director of corporate and regulatory affairs at White Cloud Electronic Cigarettes. The company, like many other manufacturers, has been hand-filling the liquid into the devices in its Chinese facility.Burton said White Cloud would like U.S. regulators eventually to approve the product as a medical device for smoking cessation. The new design, he said, should provide "consistent vapor delivery."John Wiesehan, Mistic's chief executive, said his company was moving production even though it was satisfied with the quality of the products made in China. He conceded, however, that there was a perception of inferior quality with Chinese-made products. "I wanted to remove that stigma," he said.Mistic officials expect to cut costs by moving production to the United States because the company won't have to ship the fluid and could reduce the number of workers it employs."You're in the beginning stages of this industry," Wiesehan said. "And we're developing standards as we speak."Original author: Margrett
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E-cigarette stores gain popularity

Most PopularPublished: May 23, 2014 | Last Modified: May 23, 2014 07:58PMBy Mary Ellen Godin Record-Journal staff MERIDEN — Tyler Barrow of Middletown pulled into the parking lot of The Vapor Edge, got out of his car and took out a brass cylinder. He puffed on it, exhaling a plume of fruit-scented vapor.“I’ve been eight weeks without a cigarette,” Barrow said taking another puff. “I feel a lot healthier. I have my smell and my taste back. I can tell another smoker from five feet away.”Barrow was at The Vapor Edge to buy liquid refills for his e-cigarette. A former Newport brand smoker, he says he’s enrolled in health classes for a career in medicine and believes “vaping” has helped him avoid the harmful effects of tobacco smoking. Eventually, he’d like to stop puffing all together, but for now, he feels it’s safer.E-cigarettes deliver various levels of nicotine, sometimes none, with a heated aerosol of propylene glycol and vegetable glycerol or chemicals rather than by burning tobacco.The Vapor Edge opened earlier this month in a storefront owned by Interstate Glass at 109 Hanover St. Inside is a vaping lounge, testing flavors, battery cylinders, cables, clearomizers (mouthpieces) and liquid refills. George Bouton of Naugatuck manages the store and said the location is a good fit for the vaping community. The store draws customers from as far away as Hartford.“Most people say I’m really glad I don’t have to drive to the shore,” Bouton said.There were about four to five e-cigarette stores along the shoreline in the state until about 20 more opened in the past year, Bouton said. The Vapor Edge opened its first store in Naugatuck about a year ago, followed by stores in Bristol and Torrington. E-cigarette popularity has been slower in the East than on the West Coast and Manhattan, where there are bans on their use in public.The federal Food and Drug Administration is weighing new rules for nicotine vaporizers as the e-cig industry and public health officials battle over whether the devices should be treated as less harmful cigarettes that help smokers give up tobacco or as a gateway that will lead adolescents to a dangerous habit. Health officials also worry that they weaken the public message that no smoking is acceptable.Wallingford has two proposals for e-cigarette stores that also retail other merchandise. In response, Public Health Director Eloise Hazelwood has asked the town planner and Planning and Zoning Commission to impose a moratorium on establishments that sell only electronic cigarettes or smoking paraphernalia.In addition to heating nicotine, glycol and glycerin into a vapor that is inhaled by the user, “there are also reports that the chamber or ‘tank’ is easily manipulated and other substances may be added by the end user,” Hazelwood wrote in a letter to planning officials.She further states that the FDA announced it will begin regulating electronic cigarettes by forbidding sales to minors and requiring manufacturers to include health warnings on the devices. Hazelwood adds that e-cigarettes are widely marketed to teens and there is no clinical evidence to support that they work as a smoking cessation aid.The state legislature recently passed a bill banning the sale to minors and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is expected to sign it.Boucher said that every responsible shop owner supports the ban on sales to minors and he spoke in favor of it in Hartford.He disagrees that marketing is aimed at young people, saying adults like the sweeter flavors just as they enjoy fruit-flavored vodka or other adult drinks. Most of the young people he sees don’t want to plunk down $40 to $50 on a vaping starter kit. A teen smoker is more likely to buy a loose cigarette for 50 cents at any number of convenience stores in the city. Those that do want to vape, Bouton refuses to sell to.But the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently reported that e-cigarette use among middle and high school kids doubled between 2011 and 2012.On the flip side of the health argument, Bloomberg Businessweek reported this week that a survey of almost 6,000 smokers in Britain trying to quit found that those who used electronic cigarettes were more likely to stop using smoking tobacco than those who used over-the-counter quitting aids or had no help at all.But the FDA will likely want to see more rigorous testing on relapsing, the variety of formulas, and long-term effects before regulating the products.Bouton said he’s ready to do battle against increased sin taxes on e-cigs and other possible prohibitions. He also said if the products didn’t stop smokers from using tobacco, the e-cigarette industry would have fizzled. In fact, he said his own doctor told him to stick with it.“What do they want people to go back to smoking?” Bouton This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (203) 317-2255 Twitter: @CconnbizOriginal author: Gwen
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Reynolds expanding e-cigarette production

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Reynolds American Inc. is expanding its Tobaccoville, North Carolina, manufacturing complex as it plans national distribution of its Vuse brand electronic cigarette this summer, the company said Friday.The owner of nation's second-biggest tobacco company did not disclose the costs related to the ramp-up, which will include a multi-million dollar investment for high-speed manufacturing equipment, for competitive reasons but said the move would create more than 200 jobs over the next four years.Reynolds, based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, launched Vuse in Colorado last June and plans the initial wave of national distribution next month.Production is currently done at a contractor facility in Kansas, but the company said more production will be needed for the foreseeable future to meet anticipated market demand. The company will carve out about 70,000 square feet of space in its existing 2 million-square-foot Tobaccoville facility. It does not publicly provide the number of employees that work at the plant that also makes its cigarette brands, including Camel and Pall Mall.The market for e-cigarettes has grown from the thousands of users in 2006 to several million worldwide and reached nearly $2 billion in sales last year. The battery-powered devices that heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapor that users inhale. E-cigarette users say the devices address both the addictive and behavioral aspects of smoking without the thousands of chemicals found in regular cigarettes. The Food and Drug Administration last month proposed regulating electronic cigarettes.Reynolds says the rechargeable Vuse e-cigarette has technology that monitors and adjusts heat and power more than 2,000 times per second to deliver the "perfect puff." It also has a smart light on the tip of to let users know when it's getting low, needs to be replaced or recharged."This is all about smokers getting satisfaction from these alternatives and how many smokers find that an acceptable way to enjoy nicotine instead of smoking tobacco products," Reynolds CEO Susan Cameron said at a news conference Friday with North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory. "I think we'll see this evolve and it's certainly in growth mode, but how big and how fast, we really don't know yet."The nation's biggest tobacco companies all have entered into the fast-growing electronic cigarette business as part of an industry wide push to diversify beyond the traditional cigarette business, which has become tougher in the face of tax hikes, smoking bans, health concerns and social stigma.Altria Group Inc., owner of the nation's biggest cigarette maker, Philip Morris USA, plans to expand its MarkTen electronic cigarette brand nationally during the first half of the year. Lorillard Inc., the nation's third-biggest tobacco company, acquired e-cigarette maker Blu Ecigs in April 2012. Blu now accounts for almost half of all e-cigarettes sold.___Michael Felberbaum can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/MLFelberbaum .Original author: Barry
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