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E-Smokers Stage ‘Vape-In’ to Protest NYC Ban

An e-smoker attends Vape In in New York City om April 28, 2014 to protest indoor e-smoking ban.Courtesy Anthony Collins PhotographyMore than 300 e-smokers showed up for a "vape-in" at Manhattan's Museum of Sex Monday night to protest a New York City ban on indoor e-cigarette smoking. They thumbed their noses at e-cigarette prohibitionists by dancing and vaping the night away until well past midnight, when the ban went into effect.Reason magazine, the Museum of Sex and Henley Vaporium organized and hosted the vape-in. Prominent critics of e-cigarette regulations, including Bill Godshall, the director of SmokeFree Pennsylvania, and Dr. Gilbert Ross, medical director of the American Council on Science and Health, delivered presentations and fielded questions from the audience and press.Many of the vapers who attended the event took to social media to express their disapproval of "nanny state politics" that place restrictions on e-smoking.In 120 minutes all these people will be criminals #ty4v pic.twitter.com/PFejYN1i1m— Russ (@burnt_wick) April 29, 2014It's been illegal to vape in public places in NYC for 1/2 hour. Any tickets yet, @NYCMayorsOffice? @MikeBloomberg is watching #ty4v— Jeff Stier (@JeffaStier) April 29, 2014.@BilldeBlasio this is a NYC pro-vaping event we will vape past midnight & break the law just letting you know #ty4v pic.twitter.com/q0VCSiWKLb— Russ (@burnt_wick) April 29, 2014Tara Lober, a 21-year-old from Brooklyn who attended the event, said she thinks the ban is silly."This is a health issue, yes, but I see it as closer to a civil rights issue," Lober said, adding that she currently smokes about three packs of tobacco cigarettes a month and hopes that vaping will help her kick the habit.Courtesy Anthony Collins PhotographyPHOTO: Daniel Gluck, Owner of the Museum of Sex and co-sponsor of the Vape In protest event, April 28, 2014.But so far there's no evidence that vaping is better for overcoming tobacco addiction than any other type of smoking cessation tool. In a few small studies, e-cigarettes seemed to be about as effective as nicotine patches in helping smokers kick the habit. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has called for more research on the topic.But many vape ban protesters claim the public health community is ignoring the science.Talia Eisenberg - @henleyvape - The harm of public #vapebans is they promote misconception that #vaping = #smoking. #ty4v #EcigsSaveLives— Mr. Alex Clark (@Hello_Alex) April 29, 2014“@GregTHR: Bill Godshall and the NYT's John Tierney now speaking about FDA regs and e-cigs being clearly less hazardous. #ty4v”— B Fojtik (@PositiveEnerG) April 29, 2014They point to the FDA's own report, which found that the toxicity levels in e-cigarettes are far lower than those found in tobacco cigarettes. But the FDA only tested two brands of e-cigarettes, and there are dozens on the market. The agency recently proposed new rules requiring all ingredients in e-cigarettes be approved and listed on the packaging.Some vapers even see the rules and restrictions as a plot by the government and drug companies.#ecigs will enjoy a #freeMarket for 4yrs then #FDA regs will promote a #blackmarket - Bill Godshall #ty4v— Mr. Alex Clark (@Hello_Alex) April 29, 2014Big Pharma the new enemy of health? Money behind the crusade to ban #ecigs? There IS a lot of $ in failed cessation drugs. Hmmm. #TY4V— pamela gorman (@PamelaGorman) April 29, 2014SOCIAL MEDIA EMBED CODE
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Scientific claims in the FDA deeming regulation (part 1 of ???)


by Carl V Phillips [Update -- this series continues with: Part 2 (mostly about flavoring, p.19-20) Part 3 (mostly about usage patterns, p.21-22) Part 4 (mostly about claims of what goo the regulations would do p.24-26) Some closely related posts … Continue reading →Original author: Carl V Phillips
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FDA regulation of e-cigarettes: huge costs, little or no benefit, says CASAA

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WASHINGTON, April 28, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Last week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its long-awaited draft regulations for electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other low-risk alternatives to smoking. The regulations offer little benefit, according to The Consumer Advocates for Smoke-free Alternatives Association (CASAA), the leading advocate for the current and future consumers of low-risk alternatives to smoking. However, CASAA believes that should the FDA finalize the rule in its current form, it will inflict devastating harm on consumers.

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As e-cigarette popularity leaps, worries of illegal drug use follow

E-cigarettes have fired up controversy in Minnesota this year as lawmakers wrestle with how to regulate the battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine without burning tobacco.Nicotine, though, isn't the only addiction the products can deliver. E-cigarettes are also perfect for vaporizing illegal drugs and that has federal and state officials increasingly concerned. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration last week said it would seek new regulatory powers over the devices.It's an issue that has the attention now of Minnesota law enforcement."Any type of water-soluble drugs -- and synthetic drugs would certainly fall into that category -- can be consumed through these e-cigarette devices that we're seeing more and more of," said Paul Wilson, a sergeant in the narcotics unit of the Rochester Police Department.E-cigarettes heat up very quickly and vaporize flavored liquid that comes in small cartridges. But instead of dissolving nicotine into the liquid, users can dissolve drugs like methamphetamine, powdered cocaine, and synthetic drugs like bath salts, Wilson said. The vapor has little to no odor, making it hard for officials to detect, he added."This just makes it a little more easily to conceal and a little more easily to do in public," Wilson said. "You could easily drive down the street and smoke this and no one's going to look twice, whereas if you've got a meth pipe up to your face, people are going to take notice."Statewide, law enforcement officials with the Minnesota Chiefs of Police Association say there haven't been many arrests. In Rochester, police had their first in February. Officials in nearby Dodge County made a recent arrest, too.Industry officials say e-cigarettes should not be demonized because some people abuse the devices. What's needed is more consumer education, product regulation and enforcement, said Ray Story, founder and chief executive of the Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association, an industry group."People will abuse certain products and not use it for its intended use. That doesn't necessarily mean that the product has to change," Story said. "You don't change the car that you're driving to only go 50 miles an hour. You set up speed limits and make sure that it's enforced by those regulatory bodies that enforce it."The FDA's proposal would extend the agency's tobacco authority to cover the regulation and restrictions on the sale of e-cigarettes.Regulating the $2.5 billion e-cigarette industry is one thing. But, scientists say the potential for misuse adds to concerns they already have about the device's long-term health effects.Richard Hurt, director of Mayo Clinic's Nicotine Dependence Center, expects the use of e-cigarettes for drugs other than nicotine to continue to increase -- in part because of the device's discreet nature.That's concerning, he said, because inhaling a drug is the most efficient way to get it to the brain."Inhalation of any drug helps determine its addictive potential. The faster you get it into the blood stream, the more addicting it is," he said. "That's why crack cocaine is more addicting than snorting cocaine. Because when you smoke crack cocaine it goes into the outer reaches of the lung and produces a very high level that gets to the brain very quickly."A few arrests don't yet constitute a trend, Wilson acknowledged. But officers, he said, are becoming increasingly aware that these devices can be used for more than just nicotine."The possibility for using controlled substances out of these, and the fact that it could be used in such a public manner is real, it's out there," he said. "We have to be aware of it."
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E-cigarette users reach 2 million

E-cigarettes contain liquid nicotine which is less harmful than smoking tobacco The number of people who use electronic cigarettes in the UK has tripled over the past two years to 2.1 million, a health charity estimates. It says just over half of current or ex-smokers have now tried electronic cigarettes, compared with 8% in 2010. Action on Smoking and Health (Ash) surveyed more than 12,000 adult smokers. A separate study found that most e-cigarette users were using them to reduce smoking. Use of e-cigarettes among people who have never smoked remains small at 1%, Ash said. Ash has commissioned a series of surveys on electronic cigarette use since 2010, with the latest survey conducted in March. Of those now estimated to be using electronic cigarettes, around 700,000 are thought to be ex-smokers and 1.3 million to be using them alongside normal cigarettes or tobacco. Current smokers using the cigarettes regularly have risen from 2.7% in 2010 to 17.7% in 2014. When ex-smokers were asked why they used electronic cigarettes, 71% said they wanted help giving up smoking. Among smokers, 48% said wanted to reduce the amount of tobacco they smoked and 37% said they used e-cigarettes to save money. Smoking rate fall Deborah Arnott, chief executive of Ash, said: "The dramatic rise in use of electronic cigarettes over the past four years suggests that smokers are increasingly turning to these devices to help them cut down or quit smoking. Significantly, usage among non-smokers remains negligible." Another study, The Smoking Toolkit Study, which covers England, has found that electronic cigarettes are overtaking the use of nicotine products such as patches and gum as an aid to quitting smoking. It also found that the proportion of smokers who gave up smoking in the past year had increased and smoking rates in England were continuing to fall. Study leader Prof Robert West said: "Despite claims that use of electronic cigarettes risks renormalising smoking, we found no evidence to support this view. "On the contrary, electronic cigarettes may be helping to reduce smoking as more people use them as an aid to quitting." Ms Arnott added: "While it is important to control the advertising of electronic cigarettes to make sure children and non-smokers are not being targeted, there is no evidence from our research that e-cigarettes are acting as a gateway into smoking." Ash's survey suggests that most electronic cigarettes users, or "vapers", use a rechargeable product with replaceable cartridges or a reservoir. Simon Clark, director of Forest, a group that supports smokers, said it welcomed the rise of e-cigarettes and was glad people had a choice of what to smoke. But he suggested that most smokers using e-cigarettes were experimenting with them rather than using them to give up smoking altogether. "We haven't seen a significant fall in smokers. Most smokers still find electronic cigarettes quite basic and it will take a few more years for the technology to improve."
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Embracing #VapeLife

Lots of people who vape -- that is, smoke e-cigarettes and other similar devices -- are really, really into it.Before it became a $2 billion industry and caught the attention of the FDA, which now wants to regulate it, vaping was a subject of passionate discussion on the Internet.“It’s kind of like a smoking cessation device turned hobby turned lifestyle,” Aaron David Ross, 29, an avid vaper and electronic musician in New York City, told NBC News.The word “vaping” refers to the vapor that is produced when the liquid, known as the “e-liquid” or “e-juice,” hits a heating coil in an electronic cigarette. (There are hundreds of different ways to vape, but each device basically works the same way).E-cigarettes first hit U.S. shores in 2006 from China. Today, there is an entire subculture devoted to vaping.On E-Cigarette Forum, which boasts nearly 200,000 members, people share tips and debate everything from the best e-juice to vaporize to the politics behind the proposed FDA regulations.This Video Player Requires JavaScriptIt has come to our attention that the browser you are using is either not running javascript or out of date. Please enable javascript and/or update your browser if possible.The forums are also filled with people talking about how vaping changed their lives. While the long-term effects of smoking e-cigarettes, which contain nicotine and other chemicals, is unknown, some studies indicate that it's at least as effective as nicotine patches in getting people to quit tobacco cigarettes."My boyfriend's father died of lung cancer directly caused by cigarette smoking," Elizabeth Brigham, 25, who blogs and posts videos about vaping under the name SugarVapor, wrote in an email to NBC News. "Getting people off cigarettes and into the 'vape life' is my mission because e-cigarettes are more than just about fun, it's about saving people's lives."On YouTube, there are more than 40,000 videos detailing “vape tricks,” where vapers channel their inner Gandalf from “Lord of the Rings” and blow out elaborate smoke creations.A search on Instagram for the tag #vaporn yields all kinds of custom vaping devices, known as “mods,” that people have built for fun.“It’s akin to car culture,” Ross said. “People know an insane amount of information about this one very specific thing, so when you find other people who share that knowledge, there is this great camaraderie.”This Video Player Requires JavaScriptIt has come to our attention that the browser you are using is either not running javascript or out of date. Please enable javascript and/or update your browser if possible.Ross, like Brigham, started vaping after he quit smoking tobacco cigarettes, a decision that came after a family friend was diagnosed with lung cancer. Now he finds himself vaping a few times an hour, he said, and put together a compilation of “music by vapers for vapers” with other musicians.Even Pinterest has pages devoted to the joys of vaping. And, of course, Twitter and Tumblr is full of people sharing messages about the #vapelife.Zachary Kaplan, community manager for Rhizome, a non-profit arts organization, does not vape. But he was so fascinated by the subculture that had popped up around the practice that he organized a one-day symposium in February at the New Museum in New York City called "This is the ENDD: The E-Cigarette in Context.""Right now is a moment when people who are really into it get to define what vaping looks like and what it means," he said. "As it becomes more corporate and massive corporations start defining it with their own advertising strategies, it will change. The subculture, the one we were able to witness in February, won't exist anymore."First published April 27 2014, 3:36 AM
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Electronic cigarettes: the truth behind the smoke and mirrors

No smoke without fire: (From left) Catherine Ryan, Andrew Washbourne and Leon Alegria all use e-cigarettes and fear the WA ban will spread nationally. Photo: Wolter PeetersThey arrived in black station wagons, pouncing with the purpose and precision of a crack undercover police team.Within 90 minutes, a suburban home in Perth had been turned upside down, the officers emerging with large garbage bags full of hardware.Puff daddies: E-cigs deliver nicotine in vapour. Photo: Wolter PeetersIt was a scene reminiscent of a counter-terrorism raid. But this was the West Australian Health Department swooping on small-time electronic cigarette supplier Vincent van Heerden who, they claimed, was in breach of the Tobacco Products Control Act.Advertisement Two years on, that sting has sparked a landmark legal test case that made Western Australia the first territory in the world to outlaw the sale of electronic cigarettes.The move contrasts with the approach of other places such as London, where a new cafe, The Vape Lab, not only sells e-cigarettes but rents them by the hour, offering 19 different flavours including bubblegum and custard.Advocate: Leon Alegria says the ruling lacks focus. Photo: Sahlan Hayes"We just don't need e-cigarettes here,'' said Cancer Council Australia's director of advocacy, Paul Grogan, last week. ''There are already approved services for people who claim they need these types of things to quit tobacco.''Users of e-cigarettes currently need to sidestep local restrictions and import ''personal amounts'' of nicotine from overseas. But it was thought unlikely that the actual devices would fall foul of tobacco legislation, mainly because they don't use tobacco. Then came the controversial Western Australian Supreme Court decision which, on April 10, ruled that if an e-cigarette device involves ''a hand to mouth action'' and results in the ''expulsion of vapour'', then it resembles a tobacco product and is therefore illegal.The ruling has been celebrated by anti-tobacco lobbyists. Australian Council on Smoking and Health president Mike Daube told the media that the decision was an important step in the continuing battle against smoking.Unnecessary: Becky Freeman says aids aren't needed. Photo: Marco Del GrandeIn turn, it has shocked the community of Australian e-cigarette users - many of whom are former smokers who now fear a blanket ban.''I've been trying to get off tobacco for 15 years, and having found something that works, I'm finding a rabid push to shut it down,'' says Owen Phillis, of Botany. ''I'm scared that I, and thousands of others, will wind up back on tobacco and a cancerous end if this avenue is closed.''According to a recent worldwide survey of more than 19,000 users, 81 per cent of respondents reported having completely substituted smoking with e-cigarettes. But while users may no longer be pumping up to 4000 different chemicals and carcinogens into their bloodstream, there remains no long-term studies about the actual health effects of filling lungs with vapour, morning, noon and night. On Thursday, the US Food and Drug Administration announced that all electronic cigarettes are to carry health warnings under new rules aimed at bringing e-cigarettes in line with tobacco. The regulations will also cover pipe tobacco and cigars - two products that somehow had previously been treated more leniently.The changes follow a rise in complaints from US e-cigarette users that, according to Reuters, included trouble breathing, headache, cough, dizziness, sore throat, nosebleeds, chest pain or other cardiovascular problems, and allergic reactions such as itchiness and swelling of the lips. One woman wrote that her husband began smoking e-cigarettes liberally in his car and at home after being told they were safe and that the vapour was ''just like water''.''E-cigarettes are products that prey on the most vulnerable,'' Sydney pharmacist Paul Melas says. ''Who are the most vulnerable? Those that fear early death brought on by tobacco-related diseases.''He claims the ''perception of safety'' around e-cigarettes demotivates a person from ''quitting completely'', and instead allows them to think they have more time to ''sort themselves out'' before actually making the move to quit. ''E-cigarettes do not have a place in current therapy because they do not have established safety profiles,'' he says.Sydney University lecturer in public health Dr Becky Freeman agrees: ''The reality is, most people who quit smoking don't need any quitting aid, be that gum, patches or e-cigarettes … they wake up one day and think 'Yes, I'm done with this'.''In the aftermath of the WA ruling, ''vaping'' forums have been asking how authorities can outlaw a product on the basis that it mimics another product that is legal - and kills you? ''It just doesn't add up,'' says Leon Alegria, who runs the Sydney-based e-liquid website Delicious Monsta and is an advocate for the industry to be ''regulated''. ''Aren't we losing focus on the ultimate goal? To have fewer people consume tobacco products?''But Grogan says the biggest threat from e-cigarettes is not necessarily the threat they pose to individual health, but their role in normalising smoking again."We [Cancer Council Australia] are most concerned about the aggressive way these things are being marketed to young people in particular. It's really naive not to see them as something commercial interests would like to proliferate," he says.Grogan says when he was growing up, it was normal to see teenagers smoking. "But I've got kids now, one in high school, and it kind of seems weird to them when they see someone smoking," he says. "It has been a generational change, and we have got so much to lose if we start making smoking normal again."The user: Still hooked but happyCatherine Ryan was the epitome of a typical heavy smoker.After becoming hooked at the age of 16, she developed a 25-a-day habit that jumped to as many as 40 on a ''big night out''. She languished in that cycle for 20 years.''In all that time I never once tried to quit because I loved it so much,'' she says.''My addiction was so bad, I would walk hours for a cigarette. But then last year, a friend gave me an electronic cigarette starter kit. I have never looked back.''Today, a phone app informs Ryan she is now on her 315th ''smoke-free day'' and it calculates the money she has saved as being almost $8000.''I feel so much better physically and I'm still a little shocked that I was able to move away from a habit which I had no intention of addressing.''Ryan believes electronic cigarettes successfully helped her quit because, unlike patches or lozenges, it replicates the habitual hand to mouth action. ''It feels like I'm smoking,'' she says.While acknowledging she is ''still hooked on nicotine'', Ryan says: ''I'm now down to consuming a third of the nicotine I was absorbing as a smoker. I actually see a day now when I will stop altogether.''The legal issues: Case watched closelyAll eyes are focused on Perth resident Vincent van Heerden, who has three weeks to appeal the landmark ruling by the WA Supreme Court effectively banning e-cigarettes in the state. Van Heeden's company, Heavenly Vapours, was prosecuted for selling dispensers and nicotine-free ''e-juice'' through a website.Some believe the decision could trigger a nationwide ban on electronic cigarettes.Van Heerden told Fairfax Media he wants to fight the decision, but will ultimately be guided by legal advice. ''What happens next has repercussions not just here, but internationally,'' said van Heerden. ''The sale of hardware has now been outlawed in Western Australia. Once that spreads to other states, importation will be classed as some form of loophole that also needs to be blocked. Then Australia will be known as the first country to have completely banned e-cigarettes. And, of course, other countries will follow.''In 2011, the WA Health Department targeted van Heeden over alleged breaches to section 106a of the Tobacco Products Control Act, which prohibits the sale of anything such as food or toys that mirrors a tobacco product. But in September last year, a magistrate's court judge dismissed the case ruling there was insufficient evidence that the e-cigarettes in question looked anything like traditional cigarettes or cigars, adding they resembled a ''fountain pen''.But to van Heeden's surprise, the WA Health Department lodged an appeal that proved successful. In her judgment, Justice Janine Pritchard stated: ''In my view, the evidence … supports the conclusion that the items were designed to resemble a tobacco product because they were intended to be used to inhale vapour in a manner very similar to the inhalation of tobacco smoke when using a cigarette.''The signs appear ominous for e-cigarette users in NSW. The Health Department confirmed last week it was ''continuing to monitor'' the case and waiting to see ''whether the decision may be appealed''.The health implications: Vapour warningsE-cigarettes may not contain the same lethal chemicals and carcinogens as cigarettes, but health experts warn there is still no comprehensive research into the risks of frequently inhaled vapour.Earlier this month, a US study on the effects of e-cigarette vapour on human lung cells found it could potentially change gene expression in a similar way to tobacco. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in California, the research analysed human bronchial cells that contained mutations found in smokers at risk of lung cancer. It found that cells grown under medium exposure to e-cigarette vapour changed in a similar fashion to those exposed to tobacco smoke. However, researchers acknowledge the work is only at a preliminary stage.In the meantime, most research points to e-cigarettes being a safer alternative to the old-fashioned gasper. Last year, a US study of 12 e-cigarette brands found that while certain toxicants were present, levels were between nine and 450 times lower than smoke created from combusted tobacco. Another study, led by Chris Bullen at the University of Auckland, recruited 657 smokers who wanted to quit smoking. Two groups were given a 13-week supply of either patches or e-cigarettes that delivered nicotine vapour. Another 73 were given e-cigarettes without nicotine. The success rate among the nicotine e-cigarettes was 7.3 per cent, compared with 5.8 per cent in the patch group and 4.1 per cent in the non-nicotine e-cigarette group.While no e-cigarette users fell ill from using the product, researchers said its long-term safety was unclear. ''E-cigarettes, with or without nicotine, were modestly effective at helping smokers to quit, with similar achievement of abstinence as with nicotine patches, and few adverse events,'' said the study, published in The Lancet. But, it adds: ''Uncertainty exists about the place of e-cigarettes in tobacco control, and more research is urgently needed to clearly establish their overall benefits and harms.''The US has announced all electronic cigarettes will carry health warnings. Users have reported headaches, dizziness, cardiovascular problems and allergic reactions.The role of big tobacco: Giants scrap for e-cig marketThe introduction of plain packaging had many predicting the end for Big Tobacco. Then along came a smoke-free product that some saw as an opportunity to reinvent themselves.Most big tobacco companies have already muscled in on an industry that generated a reported $US2 billion in sales last year in the US. There are an estimated 5 million users in the US alone.Lorillard, manufacturer of the Newport brand, forked out $135 million to buy Blu - the US's leading e-cigarette. Reynolds, which makes Camel, has unleashed a product called Vuse. Philip Morris International, meanwhile, has joined forces with rivals Altria, makers of Marlboro, to launch and market several new designs, including MarkTen.It is this rapidly changing landscape that, in recent days, has prompted the national regulation agency in the US to announce a crackdown on the sales and marketing of e-cigarettes. The Food and Drug Administration will force manufacturers to disclose ingredients.However, firms will still be allowed to advertise e-cigarettes - as long as they do not feature health claims. Companies will also be allowed to continue offering flavours perceived by anti-tobacco lobbyists as an attempt to target teens.How they work: Range of 'tanks' creates new fashion''E-cigarettes'', or personal vaporisers, are battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine through a solution that is heated into vapour, then inhaled and exhaled.''Vapers'' presently have to buy their nicotine in ''personal amounts'' from overseas because it remains classified as a ''dangerous poison'' and can only be sold within Australia, in the form of cigarettes, under licence.Fairfax Media reported last year that Australian e-cig community AussieVapers.com has 4000 members who swear by the gadgets, with one devotee saying ''e-cigs are the greatest innovation in health since the invention of penicillin''.The cheapest ''tanks'' can be bought for as little as $20, with some designed to look like traditional cigarettes - complete with glowing tip. But as the industry has developed, so has the range of devices and accessories. Fairfax Media caught up with several vapers last week whose habit has become their hobby, spending thousands of dollars on handcrafted limited edition tanks from around the world, complete with luxury ''drip tips'' - the mouthpiece attached to the top of device.And the latest undisputed king of tanks? The ''Piston Steampunk Mod'' built by SteampunkVapors in Albuquerque, New Mexico. At $700, it comes with its own hand-stitched leather This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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CASAA Assessment of FDA Deeming Regulation, April 25, 2014

Yesterday’s FDA draft deeming regulation regarding e-cigarettes, other smoke-free alternatives, and other products is not as bad on its face as it might have been. However, a full review -- in the context of background knowledge and institutional analysis -- reveals that the proposed regulation is inappropriate, ill-founded, and potentially devastating for consumers.

1. The proposed regulation of non-combustible tobacco products, particularly including e-cigarettes, does almost nothing to address any real problems.

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What’s so bad about e-cigs?

The Food and Drug Administration says it plans to regulate e-cigarettes, along with cigars and other tobacco products. Health advocates say it’s about time, but many “vapers” who use e-cigarettes say regulation will damage a product that’s a far safer substitute for cigarettes.“The FDA has over stepped their boundaries,” supporters wrote in an online petition posted this week. “DoNot, allow the FDA to take control of a life saving product (sic).”Even health experts agree that electronic cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a heated mist of water, glycerin and propylene glycol, might be useful in helping people who want to quit smoking. So where’s the harm in them?Mostly, it’s the unknown, the FDA says. “We can’t even tell you what the compounds are in the vapor,” FDA’s Mitch Zeller told reporters.This Video Player Requires JavaScriptIt has come to our attention that the browser you are using is either not running javascript or out of date. Please enable javascript and/or update your browser if possible.FDA regulation would require the companies to tell the agency, but not necessarily the public, what’s in their products. FDA is sensitive to protecting competitive secrets.The FDA is also asking for research on potential harms from inhaling the heated mixture. It might not be as harmful as burning tobacco leaves, but it might not be completely benign, either, says Dr. John Spangler, who runs a smoking cessation clinic at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in North Carolina.“It is true that electronic cigarettes are safer than regular cigarettes. On the other hand there are some effects in the lung of the vapors which mimic the same kind of changes that go along with asthma,” Spangler told NBC News.“That happens within 5 minutes of using an electronic cigarette. We don’t know how long that will last or whether it will lead to permanent lung damage.”Vaping enthusiasts will argue that using the products allows them to skip regular tobacco cigarettes, whose harms are well-documented. If that’s the case, many health advocates say they are all for them. But there’s not much research to say whether that’s true.Spangler’s been studying this and doesn’t have final data yet. But in general, e-cigarettes appear slightly less effective than nicotine gum or patches or drugs such as Chantix, he says.“I do have about 20 percent of my smoking patients in my clinic who are using electronic cigarettes,” he said. “Of the patients who use them, about 10 percent of them actually quit smoking using electronic cigarettes.”"Most consumers would be shocked to realize the products they buy have less oversight than a bag of dog food."And experts argue that if e-cigarette makers wanted their products used as quit-smoking aids, they’d have submitted them to the FDA as such. Instead, manufacturers fought FDA’s attempts to regulate them in that way, and won in federal appeals court.Either way, people who use them should want them regulated, says pulmonologist Dr. Nathan Cobb of Georgetown University School of Medicine.“Electronic cigarettes may represent the next evolution of nicotine replacement, supplanting the gum, patch and the existing inhaler. However, most consumers would be shocked to realize the products they buy have less oversight than a bag of dog food, and are often manufactured and imported from countries that have histories of tainted pharmaceutical and food products,” Cobb added.The fear is that smokers will use e-cigarettes as a bridge that gets them through the day in a society that increasingly restricts cigarettes. And the even bigger fear is that e-cigarettes will appeal to children, who will get addicted to nicotine.“Kids should not be initiating even an e-cigarette that contains no burning tobacco leaves because of the effect that nicotine can have on the developing brain,” Zeller says. Several studies suggest nicotine might slow the growth of the adolescent brain.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and FDA say 10 percent of high school students have tried vaping, with numbers rising steadily. More than 21 percent of adults have tried vaping at least once.The e-cigarette industry itself welcomes the FDA’s proposal. “We have no problem divulging our ingredients,” says Miguel Martin, president of e-cigarette maker Logic. Martin and other makers also say they support restricting sales to people 18 or older."FDA has worked over three years to meet the regulatory challenges presented by this very new and technology-driven industry, while preserving and supporting the enormous potential for harm reduction it offers. We share that goal," added the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association.“You should always be suspicious when the tobacco industry applauds something."Public health advocates say even that worries them. “You should always be suspicious when the tobacco industry applauds something,” says Tom Glynn, senior director of cancer science and trends for the American Cancer Society.Glynn and others remember that the tobacco industry first told Americans that cigarettes were healthful, and then battled the U.S. government in court for decades when the Surgeon General declared that smoking caused cancer. It took decades to prove that tobacco companies colluded to make cigarettes ever more addictive and to cover up research showing tobacco caused not only cancer, but heart disease, stroke, emphysema and other diseases.They also point to industry attempts to market “light” cigarettes as less dangerous — research shows they are not — and companies have pushed menthol cigarettes despite evidence that menthol worsens the health effects.“Like cigarette companies, e-cigarette makers claim they don't market to kids. But they're using the same themes and tactics tobacco companies have long used to market regular cigarettes to kids,” says Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.And nicotine itself may not be so harmless. The concentrated nicotine juice used in vaping can poison people, and Spangler says nicotine build-up in vaping salons could be dangerous, also.“We don’t know what will happen to nicotine that settles into the environment,” he said.First published April 25 2014, 6:26 AM
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E-cigarette hazards, merits unclear

1:00 AMAs the FDA gets set to regulate, health and public policy experts await more research on the devices.By Michael FelberbaumThe Associated PressWASHINGTON — The federal government’s move to regulate e-cigarettes is a leap into the unknown.click image to enlargeTalia Eisenberg, co-founder of the Henley Vaporium, uses her vaping device in New York on Feb. 20. Soon, the Food and Drug Administration will propose rules for e-cigarettes. The rules will likely have big implications for a fast-growing industry and its legions of customers.The Associated PressE-CIGARETTE FACTSThe Associated PressPipes are displayed at the Avail Vapor shop in Richmond, Va. The industry is facing regulation.THE BATTERY-POWERED devices made of plastic or metal heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapor that users inhale. Some models are disposable, and some are designed to be refilled with cartridges or tanks containing what enthusiasts call “e-juice.”Some e-cigarettes are made to look like a real cigarette with a tiny light on the tip that glows like the real thing.THE INGREDIENTS used in most e-cigarettes include nicotine, water, glycerol, propylene glycol and flavorings. Propylene glycol is a thick fluid sometimes used in antifreeze but also used as a food ingredient. While some e-cigarette makers are limiting offerings to tobacco and menthol flavors, others are selling candy-like flavors like cherry and strawberry.USERS SAY E-CIGARETTES address both the addictive and behavioral aspects of smoking. Smokers get their nicotine without the thousands of chemicals found in regular cigarettes. And they get to hold something shaped like a cigarette, while puffing and exhaling something that looks like smoke without the ash, odor and tar.SCIENTISTS HAVEN’T finished much research on e-cigarettes, their safety and whether they help smokers quit, and the studies that have been done are inconclusive. The federal government is pouring millions of dollars into research to supplement independent and company studies looking at the health risks of e-cigarettes and other tobacco products – as well as who uses them and why.– The Associated PressMost everyone agrees a ban on selling them to kids would be a step forward. But health and public policy experts can’t say for certain whether the electronic devices are a good thing or a bad thing overall, whether they help smokers kick the habit or are a gateway to ordinary paper-and-tobacco cigarettes.The proposed rules, issued Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration, tread fairly lightly. They would ban sales to anyone under 18, add warning labels and require FDA approval for new products.Some public health experts say a measured approach is the right one. They think that the devices, which heat a nicotine solution to produce an odorless vapor without the smoke and tar of burning tobacco, can help smokers quit.“This could be the single biggest opportunity that’s come along in a century to make the cigarette obsolete,” said David Abrams, executive director of the Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies at the American Legacy Foundation.Still, some wonder whether e-cigarettes keep smokers addicted or hook new users and encourage them to move on to tobacco. And some warn that the FDA regulations could have unintended consequences.“If the regulations are too heavy-handed, they’ll have the deadly effect of preventing smokers from quitting by switching to these dramatically less harmful alternatives,” said Jeff Stier, senior fellow at the National Center for Public Policy Research, a conservative think tank in Washington.Scientists haven’t finished much research on e-cigarettes, and the studies that have been done have been inconclusive. The government is pouring millions into research to supplement independent and company studies on the health risks of e-cigarettes and other tobacco products – as well as who uses them and why.“There are far more questions than answers,” acknowledged Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products.But he said the proposed rules “would result in significant public health benefits, including through reducing sales to youth, helping to correct consumer misperceptions, preventing misleading health claims and preventing new products from entering the market without scientific review by FDA.”The FDA has left the door open to further regulations, such as a ban on TV advertising and fruit- or candy-flavored e-cigarettes – measures that some anti-smoking groups and members of Congress are demanding.“It is inexcusable that it has taken the FDA and the administration so long to act. This delay has had serious public health consequences as these unregulated tobacco products have been marketed using tactics and sweet flavors that appeal to kids,” the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids said in a statement.The FDA said it wants more evidence before it rushes into more regulations.Any further rules “will have to be grounded in our growing body of knowledge and understanding about the use of e-cigarettes and their potential health risks or public health benefits,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg said.Electronic cigarettes are becoming a big business. The industry started on the Internet and at shopping-mall kiosks and has rocketed from thousands of users in 2006 to several million worldwide, with a choice of more than 200 brands.Sales are estimated to have reached nearly $2 billion in 2013. Tobaacco companies have noticed that e-smokes are eating into cigarette sales, and they have jumped into the business, too. Tweet
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FDA proposals may help e-cigarette sales

The proposed regulations are broadly speaking "as expected, and not as restrictive as some had feared," wrote Herzog, who has predicted that e-cigs could overtake traditional cigarettes in total sales within a decade. Tobacco cigarette sales are currently about $80 billion annually.Herzog warned, however, that "our main concern remains around e-cig/e-vapor innovation, which, if stifled, could dramatically slow down industry growth and conversion from combustible cigs, which would ultimately result in net negative public health impact."Rob Burton, director of corporate regulation affairs at White Cloud Electronic Cigarettes, was pleased there was no outright ban on flavoring proposed by the FDA. White Cloud sells e-cig liquid in five different strengths—including zero-percent nicotine—and in 19 different flavors.Read MoreReynolds brings back Susan Cameron as CEO"We feel that just because you're an adult doesn't mean that you shouldn't have a choice of flavors," Burton said. "The wider the choice, the better the opportunity for them to switch to the alternative" from traditional cigarettes, he said.Burton also was happy that the proposed rules open the door to the possibility that e-cig manufacturers will be able to make health-based claims. The FDA said Thursday that such "direct and implied claims of reduced risk" could be made "if the FDA confirms that scientific evidence supports the claim and that marketing the product will benefit public health as a whole."Although e-cig companies currently do not make such health-based claims, many of their users have adopted the products in the belief that they are significantly safer than tobacco cigarettes, even as extensive studies on the new products has yet to be performed.Smoking tobacco products leads to the deaths of an estimated 480,000 people in the U.S. each year.That death toll was echoed in a response to the proposed regulations by Craig Weiss, president and CEO of NJOY, one of the top-selling e-cig companies.Read MorePassenger claims Air Canada let man 'vape' onboard"By resisting calls to regulate ahead of—and indeed in opposition to—the science and the data, today the FDA has brought NJOY a giant step closer to achieving its corporate mission of obsoleting cigarettes," Weiss said. "There are encouraging signs that 10 years from now, this date will be remembered as the beginning of the end of the tobacco epidemic."That said, the tobacco companies themselves are poised to exploit their huge piles of cash and retail-channel distribution networks as they try to gain market share in e-cigs.Wells Fargo's Herzog, in her research note, wrote that she expects the "e-cig battleground" to get hotter this year, "especially as the 'Big 3' tobacco manufacturers push further into the category.""We expect the 'Big 3' to ultimately have a meaningful presence and to accelerate growth in the category," Herzog wrote.Altria, in a prepared statement, said it and its tobacco companies "have expressed support of the FDA extending appropriate regulatory authority over cigars and e-vapor products.""With these proposed deeming regulations, we believe FDA has an unprecedented opportunity to advance public health goals by recognizing that some types of tobacco products may have significantly lower risks compared to cigarettes," Altria said. "We believe FDA should adopt a regulatory framework that recognizes the differences in tobacco products and fosters innovation that may benefit public health. The framework must be grounded in science and evidence. FDA is in the best position to assess the science and determine how best to communicate relative risk information to consumers.""We are in the process of reviewing the proposed regulations and will provide our perspective to the FDA."In its own statement, Reynolds American said, "We are currently reviewing the proposed deeming regulation and are not in a position to comment on anything specific at this time.""It's important to note that the issuance of the draft deeming regulation simply begins a process that includes a 75-day public comment period. We will provide comments on the draft regulation and participate in the rulemaking process," Reynolds said. "Additionally, the issuance of the proposed deeming regulation does not affect the current marketplace for e-cigarettes."—By CNBC's Dan Mangan.
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Durbin, Democrats say proposed e-cigarette regulations don’t go far enough

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration's proposed new regulations on the burgeoning e-cigarette industry don't go far enough for Democrat critics in Congress, who wanted the agency to clamp down on advertising they say is aimed at minors.Last week 11 Democrats in Congress, including Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., issued a report they said showed that companies were aiming at youth audiences by spotlighting flavored cigarettes and advertising around youth-oriented events.The proposed regulations announced today by the FDA would prohibit the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and require health labels warning smokers of nicotine''s addictive properties. Marketers could not declare the product was safer than cigarettes or other tobacco products, would have to disclose ingredients, and register their products with the FDA.Critics, including Durbin, issued a statement saying they were "extremely disappointed by (FDA's) failure to take comprehensive action to prevent e-cigarette companies from continuing to deploy marketing tactics aimed at luring children and teenagers into candy-flavored nicotine addiction."Prohibiting sales of e-cigarettes to minors "is a positive step," the congressional critics' statement said, "but it isn't enough."In his own statement, Durbin was even harsher."Shame on the FDA," he said, adding that "parents across America lost their best ally in protecting their kids from this insidious product."E-cigarettes use a small battery to atomize a liquid solution of nicotine without burning. Among other things, its advocates say it is a way to allow cigarette and cigar smokers to quit. The proposed FDA regulations would not allow e-cigarette advertisers to use terms like "light" to describe the product. The e-cigarette industry is rapidly growing. U.S. sales are expected to rise from about $1.6 billion last year to $3 billion in 2014, according to Thomas Kiklas, co-founder of the Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association, which represents roughly 300 e-cigarette manufacturers and distributors. He said manufacturers do not want to sell to children, either.When Durbin and Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., released last week's report criticizing the industry's advertising, Kiklas accused them of "trying to demonize us by using kids." He said manufacturers of e-cigarettes did not want to market to children, and denied that the advertising of flavored cigarettes was aimed at them.His association issued a statement on its Web site Thursday that was generally supportive of the proposed FDA regulations, and pointed out that the industry had worked successfully with European regulators."We strive for a consistent, reliable, and less harmful product that has been subjected to the scrutiny that products should face for human consumption," the statement said. "This allows the category to compete with conventional tobacco as a less harmful alternative." 
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Call to Action! Iowa - Support Ban on Sales to Minors (HF 2109 with Dotzler Amendment S-5088)

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Iowa: Ask Iowa State Senators to to Vote YES on HF 2109 with Dotzler Amendment (S-5088)

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FDA releases e-cigarette rules

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Today the FDA finally released its long-awaited proposed rules on e-cigarettes.

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Federal E-Cigarette Data AWOL

Americans are familiar with the census, taken every 10 years by the U.S. Census Bureau, but few are aware that the Bureau regularly collects information on a range of demographic, social and economic characteristics through Current Population Survey (CPS) supplements, which are sponsored by various government agencies.The National Cancer Institute regularly sponsors the CPS Tobacco Use Supplement (TUS), which was conducted most recently in May and August 2010, and January 2011 (information here). These datasets and accompanying technical documentation are available for download and analysis by tobacco researchers (here). Surprisingly, another TUS, conducted in May 2011 and described in a technical document as a follow-up survey that includes information on e-cigarettes (here), has never been released. This conflicts with Census Bureau guidance that supplements “are available anywhere from 6 to 18 months after data collection.” (here) The 36-month-and-counting delay is troubling. High ranking government officials have been campaigning against e-cigarettes for some time, creating demand for FDA regulation. The NCI, sponsor of this TUS, has been a powerful opponent of anything related to tobacco harm reduction. Is it possible that NCI officials are not releasing e-cigarette data until FDA regulations are issued?The NCI has suppressed positive positive data in the past. An NCI-sponsored supplement to the 2000 National Health Interview Survey asked current and former smokers the method they had used to try to quit smoking. One response was “switch to smokeless tobacco.” Carl Phillips and I published an analysis of this survey, noting that it provided the first population-level evidence that American men have quit smoking by switching to smokeless tobacco (here). Five years later, despite the fact that tobacco harm reduction had gained increased visibility and more American smokers were likely making the switch, the NCI struck the switch-to-smokeless query from the survey, denying the public information about this cessation option. Public health requires public access to taxpayer-funded survey data. NCI should be an ally in this regard, not an obstacle.
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Timeline of electronic cigarettes milestones leading to proposed FDA regulations

Late 2006: Electronic cigarettes first marketed in U.S. via kiosks in shopping malls and online. Early 2009: E-cigarette sellers sue the Food and Drug Administration after the agency told customs officials to refuse entry of shipments into U.S. June 2009: The Food and Drug Administration said testing of products from two leading electronic cigarette makers turned up several toxic chemicals, including a key ingredient in antifreeze. January 2010: Federal judge rules that the FDA can't stop those shipments, saying the agency had overstepped its authority. December 2010: Federal appeals court rules e-cigarettes should be regulated as tobacco products by the FDA rather than as drug-delivery devices. February 2011: U.S. Department of Transportation prohibits use of e-cigarettes on commercial airlines. April 2011: FDA announces plans to regulate electronic cigarettes as tobacco products. July 2011: FDA announces intent to have e-cigarette regulations proposed by October 2011. April 2012: Lorillard Inc., the nation's third-biggest tobacco company, buys Blu Ecigs. Summer 2012: No. 2 tobacco company Reynolds American Inc. begins limited distribution of first electronic cigarette under Vuse brand. February 2013: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention releases study showing increased awareness and use of electronic cigarettes in the U.S. March 2013: Former U.S. surgeon general Dr. Richard Carmona joins board of directors for e-cigarette maker NJOY Inc. July 2013: Reynolds American launches test market of revamped version of Vuse e-cigarette. August 2013: Subsidiary of Altria Group Inc., owner of the nation's biggest tobacco company, Philip Morris USA, launches test market first e-cigarette under MarkTen brand name. September 2013: CDC releases study showing growing use of e-cigarettes by middle and high school students. End of 2013: Sales of e-cigarettes reach nearly $2 billion with more than 200 brands. April 24, 2014: FDA issues proposed regulations for electronic cigarettes.
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No longer blowing smoke? E-cigarettes could surpass traditional brands, experts say

When change has come for tobacco during its nearly two centuries as a star of North Carolina’s economy, it usually has arrived at a leisurely pace.Not this time. The crop and products made from it face something that has gutted or transformed many other industries in recent years: a disruptive technology.Electronic cigarettes are winning over smokers so quickly that some analysts predict the battery-powered newcomer could come out on top of traditional cigarettes within a decade. That’s unsettling for the farmers and manufacturers who still make North Carolina the national leader in tobacco production and rivaled only by Virginia in cigarette manufacturing.E-cigarettes heat a liquid, usually containing the highly addictive stimulant nicotine, into a vapor that users inhale. Nicotine for the liquid is extracted from tobacco, but experts think it may take less tobacco to make the “juice” than required for an equivalent amount of traditional cigarettes.That economic threat can also be an opportunity, partly because of the state’s decades of tobacco expertise and partly because of an odd bit of luck involving a plant called clary sage.Some think that e-cigarettes may even offer a way to slow the gradual slide in tobacco sales for domestic use, a slide that began decades before the advent of e-cigarettes.“It has been interesting to watch e-cigarettes move from almost a novelty to a trend,” said state Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “The bad news is, if it results in the decline of demand for traditional tobacco, then we are going to have a new set of problems, but the good news is, yes, we are poised to take advantage of it.”This may be the key year in North Carolina’s effort to muscle into that leadership role. One reason is that Big Tobacco is becoming Big Vapor, too: Major tobacco companies are moving to get ahead of the potential shift in the market by selling e-cigarettes themselves, either by buying companies already in the business or starting their own. And two of the nation’s three largest tobacco companies are here.With their deep pockets, intimate knowledge of the market, powerful research-and-development capacity and massive sales and distribution networks, they are in a position to quickly seize the majority of the market for e-cigarettes, said Bonnie Herzog, an analyst with Wells Fargo Securities who follows the e-cigarette and tobacco industries.She and other experts believe that the big companies will market devices that simply work better, which will win over more smokers.Greensboro-based Lorillard, the nation’s third-largest tobacco company, has been perhaps the most aggressive, snapping up an established e-cigarette company called Blu in 2012 for $135 million. Lorillard now has nearly half the national market share for e-cigarettes.And the nation’s second-largest tobacco company, Reynolds American Inc., based in Winston-Salem, has launched its own e-cigarette subsidiary, R.J. Reynolds Vapor Co. It has developed an e-cigarette that, unlike nearly all its rivals, is made in the United States.Reynolds is planning to launch its Vuse brand nationwide this summer. Its test-marketing results suggest the impact will be huge. In July, it started sales in Colorado and quickly gained more than half the market in that state. And RJR Vapor Co. President Stephanie Cordisco said in an interview that a second phase of test marketing that began in Utah in late January is showing similar results.The largest tobacco company, Richmond, Va.-based Altria Group, has test-marketed its own e-cigarette, MarkTen, in two states and plans to go national in the second quarter of the year. Altria is the parent company of Philip Morris.Transforming a marketThe stakes are huge. Last year, Herzog forecast that by 2023, Reynolds could earn $5.2 billion in revenue from e-cigarettes and $3.1 billion from traditional ones. And it, Lorillard and Altria would all see about half their revenue from traditional cigarettes vanish by 2023.If analysts such as Herzog are right, the tobacco companies have to get involved to protect not just their profits, but perhaps their future, said Blake Brown, a professor of agriculture and resource economics at N.C. State University and an extension economist who specializes in tobacco issues.“They can’t afford not to do this,” he said. “If you’re a tobacco company, you don’t want to be the next Eastman Kodak. They didn’t understand that they were in the image business. They thought they were in the film business.”This shift in history doesn’t seem lost on Big Tobacco. Lorrillard has a research and development team based in Silicon Valley. And at a Reynolds American media event in June, company President Daan Delen, tieless and in a sports jacket, roamed a stage at Pier 59 in New York, channeling the late Apple founder Steve Jobs as he unveiled Vuse. In interviews, Reynolds executives frequently use words such as “transformative” and “game-changing” for their new venture.The drop in domestic tobacco consumption, which has come at an annual rate of 3 percent to 4 percent in recent years, had already been eroding cigarette manufacturing for decades. Tobacco manufacturing employment in North Carolina is about a quarter of what it was at its peak half a century ago.Reynolds now declines to specify where its 5,200 U.S. workers are located, but in 2012 it reported that roughly 2,100 were in the Winston-Salem area. Like many other tobacco-related companies, it has seen its workforce drop substantially, from about 15,000 tobacco manufacturing workers in 1987 in the Winston-Salem area.The chance to reverse that erosion isn’t lost on Reynolds executives.“One of the things that I communicate to my team is that if we’re successful, we see jobs happening here,” Cordisco said. “We’re bringing jobs back to this company, and that’s what’s exciting.”She declined to give employment numbers but said that RJR Vapor Co. has created jobs in several states, some within the company, some with suppliers. In Kansas, it makes the cartridges. In its Tobaccoville manufacturing complex near Winston-Salem, it does the final packaging.For now, the number of employees working for e-cigarette companies is relatively small because the industry is small, said Herzog, the analyst.“Just to put it in perspective, retail sales (of e-cigarettes) were $1.8 billion in the U.S. last year, estimated, and that compares to an $85 billion combustible cigarette market,” she said. “But I certainly expect that consumption of e-cigs will pass consumption of combustible cigarettes in the next 10 years, and as that trajectory continues, absolutely you’re going to see companies get larger and hire more employees.”For now, most e-cigarette companies, including Lorillard’s Blu, have their devices made in China, though Blu gets its liquid from a company in Wisconsin.Herzog believes that it’s likely others will follow Reynolds’ path and move the manufacturing to the United States, where they can better control quality. Federal regulations, which are widely expected to come soon from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, may include standards that would push more companies to make e-cigarettes in the U.S., she said.The magic of clary sageThe potential upside to e-cigarettes also may include farmers.For much of tobacco’s history in North Carolina, the state’s climate and soil were natural advantages that helped them produce a product of high quality and good taste. Farmers could fend off tobacco produced in countries where the labor was cheaper, or the climate so hot year round that two crops were possible.But one potential competitive advantage North Carolina farmers have for any e-cigarette comes from good luck: Avoca, a large botanical extraction company, is located in Bertie County near Edenton, not far from many of the state’s top tobacco-producing counties.There, it mainly has been extracting a fixative from a type of sage that helps scents last longer in perfumes and things such as laundry products. Farmers are now growing thousands of acres of the purple-flowered clary sage in the area.Last fall, Richmond, Va.-based Universal Leaf, the top vendor of leaf tobacco in the world, and Avoca announced a joint venture called AmeriNic that’s already extracting nicotine from tobacco and is planning to begin commercial sales this year, company leaders said in an emailed response to questions.The partners believe it to be the only operation in the country that extracts and purifies nicotine, an addictive stimulant in tobacco and a crucial ingredient in most e-cigarette “juice.”Farmers are watching the venture closely.“We think there is an opportunity, and we want to be the ones to fill that need,” said Graham Boyd, executive vice president of the Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina.It’s unclear how much tobacco e-cigarette makers will need and where they will get it. In its response to questions, Universal Leaf declined to say where it plans to get its tobacco for extraction but said that its efforts to breed plants specifically for nicotine production were being done here, at least in part.“At this time, we are evaluating various sourcing options,” the company said. “Given our long history of purchasing quality tobaccos in North Carolina, we have included farms in the state as part of our R&D effort.”The need for nicotineDr. Loren Fisher, an associate professor of crop science and extension tobacco specialist at NCSU, said one advantage that North Carolina has in trying to reap some benefit from e-cigarettes is its centuries of hard-won knowledge about breeding and growing tobacco. He thinks it will be relatively easy to develop plants that are efficient little green factories for producing large amounts of nicotine, as opposed to the current goals of taste and the quality of the leaves.“I think we know right now what it takes to breed plants that would produce more nicotine,” he said.For the short term, growing tobacco for nicotine could turn out to be mainly an additional market, he said, rather than just a way to replace declining sales form the domestic market. That’s because most of the state’s tobacco crop is now exported and its foreign customers are feeling less effect from e-cigarette competition.For now, Troxler said, North Carolina’s tobacco crop seems to have stabilized, mainly because of overseas demand. Chinese demand for tobacco is rising, and last summer China’s national tobacco company opened an office in Raleigh as a base for its American tobacco-buying operations.But foreign demand may not remain steady, particularly if e-cigarettes also start making strong inroads overseas.The pace of the e-cigarette revolution could be affected by the nature of federal regulations that are believed to be in the pipeline. It also could be slowed by factors such as the emergence of other new kinds of tobacco products, or accelerated by something that Big Tobacco is likely to prove good at: advances in technology that make e-cigarettes even more attractive to smokers, Herzog said.It also could be slowed if e-cigarettes are hit with taxes by governments desperate to make up for lost revenue from the drop in traditional cigarette sales.Cigarettes are the largest cause of preventable deaths; e-cigarettes are believed to be significantly safer, but there is little research on their health effects. There is a debate among public health officials about how much to encourage smokers to switch to e-cigarettes by doing things like keeping taxes on them low. Some worry that the devices, with available flavors such as custard, berry or apple pie, encourage use by children.Brown, the NCSU tobacco economist, believes that something will bring big changes to the market, though he says it’s still too early to say that it will be e-cigarettes.Philip Morris, he noted, recently announced that it’s investing $680 million in a new Italian plant that would make noncombustible cigarettes, devices in which tobacco is heated just enough to give off inhalants, but not enough to burn.“There may not be smoking in five years, but there will be something different, whether it’s e-cigarettes or noncombustibles or something, but it’s going to be changed dramatically,” Brown said. “And to predict how it will change, and how that will affect manufacturing is difficult right now.”By Jay Price CallSend SMSAdd to SkypeYou’ll need Skype CreditFree via Skype No longer blowing smoke? E-cigarettes could surpass traditional brands, experts say
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It’s Vaping, Not Smoking

If it’s okay with you all, I’d like to vent a little.

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electronic cigarette reviews

23Apr, 2014by Brooke Taylor on April 23, 2014When shopping for e cigarettes, it is wise to have a list by your side indicating all of the features you are going to come across. Don’t go searching for the lowest price. Instead, create a budget and get started. The Lowest Budget For someone who sets only $10 aside to try an electronic cigarette, disposables are the best and only choices. No complete rechargeable products cost as little as this, though separate parts might. Your goal with a disposable is to experiment with the way a mini cig feels when you hold it and draw on the vapor. If you plan to buy disposables online, add shipping fees into the cost. Not all companies charge shipping, but most of them state that the cost of mailing out your goods is free only when you reach a particular amount: as little as $20 and as much as $150. Without shipping, disposable e cigarettes are priced from $4 to $10 online. Those prices represent varying markups and the number of puffs you should get out of them. Disposable e-cigs and e-hookahs are sold at convenience stores and gas stations. While many companies have introduced multiple flavors, most brands provide one-time e-cigs in just tobacco or menthol and one or maybe two choices of nicotine level. Next Step Either you liked the disposable you tried or you skipped their one-time wastefulness and you want to start with a small kit. Your budget is around $25 to $30, in which case an essentials package would suit your needs. An essentials package goes by many names, but what it amounts to is almost always the same. You receive one rechargeable battery, a USB charger, and two refill cartridges. Like disposables, these packages typically contain either menthol or tobacco in a specified nicotine level. There are always exceptions. Some kits contain 4 refills. Certain brands offer four or five levels of nicotine. Prices swing widely: from $15 to $30 for the same thing. Packaging is also varied with a number of companies opting for the cigarette-pack look and at least one choosing a metal tin. For More Money Customers don’t really understand how e cigarettes work until they have owned a rechargeable one. Starter Kits from $30 and upwards contain at least one battery, but buying a two-battery unit is much more efficient. They are small and run out quickly. Starter kits also contain more refills, at least five, and there is more choice of flavors and strengths when you pay more for a bigger package. That is, more choice is afforded to customers wherever companies sell multiple flavors. A few brands only sell tobacco and menthol, continuing to appeal to ex-smokers and refusing to encourage underage vaping with fruit and chocolate filters. If you plan to keep vaping into the future, choose a company with lots of options. Bigger starter kits come with pass-through batteries, charging cases, wall adapters, and car adapters. It’s ultimately cheaper to buy a kit with all the things you
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FDA reveals its views on ecigs in new publication (part 3), and some thoughts on their new deadlines


by Carl V Phillips This continues from the previous post, in a series that started here. I realize that mining journal articles for insights gets a little dry, as important as it is.  So I will start with something related.  In a new … Continue reading →Original author: Carl V Phillips
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