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Welcome to the blog area of our site where we hope to keep you updated on the trends of the e-cigarette industry as well as product reviews.

New Jersey GASP Pushing Legislation that Would Ban Electronic Cigarette Use on Every State Beach, But Allow Casino Workers to Inhale Huge Amounts of Secondhand Smoke to Make a Living

Do anti-smoking groups have any sense of perspective? The answer appears to be "no" based on the latest news out of the Garden State.New Jersey GASP is pushing for state legislation that would ban smoking everywhere on college campuses, including in remote alleys and parking lots and would ban electronic cigarette use on a remote area of a beach, but allow smoking to continue unencumbered in crowded Atlantic City casinos, where hundreds of workers are suffering debilitating diseases because of their secondhand smoke exposure.According to a NJTV News article: "More towns are banning smoking at the beach in New Jersey. Global Advisors on Smokefree Policy (GASP) Executive Director Karen Blumenfeld told NJTV News Managing Editor Mike Schneider that GASP really wants a 100 percent smoke-free environment in public places." The Rest of the StoryGASP may want a 100% smoke-free environment in public places, but it said nothing in the entire news interview about the real public health problem in New Jersey: secondhand smoke exposure in the state's casinos. Moreover, while GASP is promoting legislation to get rid of every last wisp of smoke on entire college campuses and to ban electronic cigarette use in remote areas of a beach, the legislation that the group is supporting allows smoking to continue unabated in the state's casinos, where hundreds of workers are suffering from real diseases brought on by secondhand smoke exposure.Were I a casino worker in New Jersey, I would be pissed off that GASP is supporting legislation to protect the public from the imaginary public health threat of deadly secondhand smoke exposure on beaches and in college parking lots, while that very legislation does nothing to protect me from the very real threat I face every day from the devastating effects of 40 hours or more per week of high levels of secondhand smoke exposure.According to ANR: "The average level of cotinine (metabolized nicotine) among nonsmokers increased by 456% and the average levels of the carcinogen NNAL increased by 112% after four hours of exposure to secondhand smoke in a smoke-filled casino with a "sophisticated" ventilation system."In contrast, I'm not aware of a single study showing that banning smoking everywhere on college campuses or on beaches is necessary to protect the public from any substantial public health threat.Perhaps I wouldn't be so bothered by this attempt to protect the public from every last wisp of smoke on beaches if state politicians had some integrity and were willing to also protect the state's citizens who need it the most: New Jersey's casino and gaming workers.The rest of the story is that GASP as well as New Jersey politicians who are pretending to show a genuine concern for the public's health are actually showing little but hypocrisy and political cowardice. In 2014, I don't see any need for this kind of public health nonsense.Original author: Michael Siegel
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E-Cigarette Advertising Soars on American TV, Study Finds

June 02, 2014MONDAY, June 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Commercials that promote electronic cigarettes have become a growing presence on American TV, new research finds, with the youth audience for such ads roughly tripling in recent years.The upshot: E-cigarettes are now being pitched to roughly 24 million viewers between the ages of 12 and 24, the study authors said.The findings raise concerns about the promotion and popularity of e-cigarettes, given the range of unanswered questions regarding their safety."The is the first piece of evidence to show exactly how much e-cigarette advertising our youth is seeing," explained study author Jennifer Duke, a senior research public health analyst with RTI International in Research Triangle Park, N.C. "And what we found is that while in 2010 e-cigarette advertising on TV was very limited, the increase since that time has been very dramatic.""Now, the manufacturers say that they are not targeting youth," Duke noted. "But the truth is that it's impossible on a medium like TV to increase ad exposure to this degree and not increase exposure to youth. And it's also clear that the increase in advertising is specifically happening on shows and cable networks that are very popular with youth."Duke and her colleagues report their findings online June 2 and in the July print issue of Pediatrics.Duke pointed out that while TV advertising for traditional cigarettes has been banned since 1971, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration only regulates e-cigarettes when they are specifically marketed as smoking-cessation devices.The FDA in April proposed long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.The new rules would give the FDA the authority to regulate e-cigarettes as tobacco products, placing them under the same requirements as cigarettes. That would include a ban on the sale to minors.E-cigarettes are essentially nicotine-delivery systems that rely on battery-powered heating mechanisms to vaporize chemicals for easy inhaling. And although e-cigarettes are usually designed to mimic the appearance of a traditional cigarette, they are distinguished by a smokeless environment that does away with the need for burning tobacco.Federal health experts caution that the safety of e-cigarettes remains unclear until more rigorous studies are conducted. And they stress that the absence of toxic combustion does nothing to undercut the highly addictive nature of nicotine itself. Nor is it yet clear what level of threat may be posed by other carcinogenic chemicals commonly found in e-cigarette vapor.To evaluate current e-cigarette advertising trends on TV, the study authors reviewed information provided by Nielsen, the main collector of TV advertising data.Focusing on the years 2011 through 2013, the study team tracked all the e-cigarette advertisements that aired on more than 100 network and cable channels across 210 different markets.The result: the number of children between 12 and 17 who were exposed to e-cigarette ads on TV rose more than 250 percent between 2011 and 2013.Among young adults between 18 and 24, that increase amounted to more than 320 percent.More than three-quarters of the ads were airing on networks known to be popular with young people, including Comedy Central, TV Land, WGN America, VH1, Country Music Television and AMC."I would say that we don't know what exposure to e-cigarettes will do over time," Duke acknowledged. "We don't yet know if they are a pathway to use of traditional cigarettes themselves. But we do know the negative effect nicotine has on brain development among youth. So it's a real concern. And given the potential dangers, I certainly think the FDA should regulate images of e-cigarettes on TV and other places where they do advertising, just as they already do for regular cigarettes."Dr. Norman Edelman, senior medical advisor for the American Lung Association, said that growth in e-cigarette advertising isn't particularly surprising."As e-cigs enter the 'mainstream' and are produced by bigger manufacturers, they are more likely to be promoted by the more expensive but more widely accessed major media, such as cable TV," he said. "[And] there seems little doubt that the makers will consider teenage children as a major market and will market to them, albeit indirectly by indicating that they are 'for adults.' "Edelman said the attempt to place e-cigarettes before a wide audience of young Americans is a troublesome development."There is little doubt that inhalation of nicotine embedded in chemically active vapor vehicles causes at least some harm," he added. "Whether it causes as much harm as tobacco smoke is a complex and unresolved question, which might be relevant to adult smokers. However, it is not relevant for children, who will not use the device as a replacement for tobacco smoke but as an initiation to nicotine inhalation -- a highly addictive substance with deleterious biologic effects in the doses associated with e-cigs.""Clearly it is important that we develop policies to protect children from this potential threat," Edelman said.More informationFor more information on e-cigarettes, visit the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse.Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.SOURCES: Jennifer Duke, Ph.D., senior research public health analyst, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.; Norman Edelman, M.D., senior medical advisor, American Lung Association; July 2014 Pediatrics...Original author: Maximus
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How to switch from tobacco to electronic cigarettes?

This post is based on personal experience and hearsay rather than scientific evidence. Many years of interaction with successful and less successful users of electronic cigarettes make me believe in certain prerequisites for an effective switch from tobacco smoking to the inhalation of nicotine containing vapor. It is a pity to watch people giving up electronic […]

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How to switch from tobacco to electronic cigarettes?

This post is based on personal experience and hearsay rather than scientific evidence. Many years of interaction with successful and less successful users of electronic cigarettes make me believe in certain prerequisites for an effective switch from tobacco smoking to the inhalation of nicotine containing vapor. It is a pity to watch people giving up electronic […]

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Electronic cigarettes and nicotine poisoning

In view of the established toxic effects of nicotine, the widespread  availability of nicotine containing liquids used to refill electronic cigarettes may pose a certain health risk, and even fatal outcomes of nicotine poisoning have been predicted by some public health advocates. Here I won’t talk about deliberate misuse by e.g. intravenous injection of nicotine containing solutions […]

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Electronic cigarettes and nicotine poisoning

In view of the established toxic effects of nicotine, the widespread  availability of nicotine containing liquids used to refill electronic cigarettes may pose a certain health risk, and even fatal outcomes of nicotine poisoning have been predicted by some public health advocates. Here I won’t talk about deliberate misuse by e.g. intravenous injection of nicotine containing solutions […]

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Pfizer Publicly Undermines and Refutes Black Box Warning for Chantix; Should Face Penalties or Removal of Drug from Market

The black box warning for Chantix, which is required by the FDA to be placed on this smoking cessation drug made by Pfizer, notes the following:"All patients being treated with CHANTIX should be observed for neuropsychiatric symptoms including changes in behavior, hostility, agitation, depressed mood, and suicide-related events, including ideation, behavior, and attempted suicide. These symptoms, as well as worsening of pre-existing psychiatric illness and completed suicide, have been reported in some patients attempting to quit smoking while taking CHANTIX in the postmarketing experience. ... Advise patients and caregivers that the patient should stop taking CHANTIX and contact a healthcare provider immediately if agitation, hostility, depressed mood, or changes in behavior or thinking that are not typical for the patient are observed, or if the patient develops suicidal ideation or suicidal behavior."The black box warning, then, advises physicians to observe patients being put on Chantix for "suicide-related events," including "suicide."The requirement by the FDA that this black box warning be placed on Chantix is based on the agency's assessment of hundreds of cases of suicides that occurred in patients who had recently been treated with the drug, as well as thousands of cases of other serious adverse neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with the use of Chantix. In making a decision to require a black box warning, the agency takes into consideration the likelihood that the observed association between the drug and the adverse effects is a causal one.In my opinion, it is the responsibility of the company that markets the drug in question not to undermine, refute, or publicly challenge the black box warning once the FDA has made a decision to require this warning. It is the FDA's scientific judgment, not that of the pharmaceutical company, that should be the final word in making the decision about whether or not a black box warning is required and what the black box warning should state. If the company refutes the black box warning publicly once it has been required, then it is essentially thumbing its nose at the FDA and substituting its own scientific judgment for that of the agency.The Rest of the StoryResponding to a news media request for a quote regarding a murder/attempted suicide case in which the defendant claims he acted as a result of depression induced by Chantix, Pfizer publicly refuted the FDA's required black box warning and denied that there is any reliable evidence that Chantix can cause severe neuropsychiatric events, such as suicide or similar violent actions.According to an ABC News article:"Pfizer released a statement defending the smoking cessation medication. “Chantix has been studied extensively and there is no reliable scientific evidence that the medicine causes serious neuropsychiatric events like the violence in this case,” a Pfizer spokesperson told ABC 10 News."In my view, this refutation and undermining of its own black box warning violates accepted standards of pharmaceutical company conduct, and should prompt either penalties or the removal of the drug from the market. If Pfizer is going to publicly undermine the required black box warning, then clearly that warning is not adequate to protect consumers and the FDA must either penalize Pfizer so that it desists from this behavior or pull the drug from the market since it is becoming clear that the company is undermining that warning in the eyes of the public.This is the equivalent of a cigarette company refuting the required warnings that are made on a cigarette package. The cigarette companies are free to fight the cigarette warning labels as they are being considered, but once a federal body requires those warnings, the companies must not act to undermine the required warnings. In this case, Pfizer's actions are more grievous than those of a cigarette company undermining a package warning because the black box warnings are required by a federal regulatory safety agency, rather than by a Congressional act. More specifically, the black box warnings are an official part of the formal approval of the marketing and sale of the drug. The company may not sell the drug without the warning. By publicly undermining and refuting the warning, the company is essentially violating the terms of the drug's approval.Had there been no reliable evidence that Chantix may cause serious neuropsychiatric events like suicide or other violent behavior, then why did the FDA conclude - after reviewing the evidence - that a black box warning is required?And why did the FDA require Pfizer to warn doctors that patients taking the drug should be "observed for neuropsychiatric symptoms including changes in behavior, hostility, agitation, depressed mood, and suicide-related events, including ideation, behavior, and attempted suicide ... as well as worsening of pre-existing psychiatric illness and completed suicide."By publicly refuting the black box warning, Pfizer is literally spitting in the face of the FDA. This is not appropriate. The company should either be penalized and forced to discontinue its campaign of refutation of the black box warning findings, or the drug should be pulled from the market due to a finding that the company has violated the terms of the drug's approval.Of course, the FDA is not going to take either of these actions. Because it knows where its bread is buttered. In contrast, however, the very same agency is prepared to pull thousands of electronic cigarettes from the market even though there really is no reliable evidence of any harms being caused by these products (with the exception of exploding batteries, which the agency should immediately address via a manufacturing standard requirement).Original author: Michael Siegel
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The New Joe Camel? E-Cigarette Ads Spook Anti-Smoking Activists

Some anti-smoking advocates fear the rise of a new, battery-powered Joe Camel as researchers find that more young people are being exposed to unregulated electronic cigarette ads mixed in with popular TV shows.More than four decades after President Richard Nixon banned ads for tobacco cigarettes on radio and television, the airwaves are burning up with e-cigarette ads targeted at adolescents and young adults, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.“This is what we saw back in the 1960s and 1950s, and the study is deeply concerning to me,” says Matthew Myers, president of the Washington, DC-based Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. “Congress banned this (TV ads) precisely because of the unique impact it can have on kids. E-cigarettes are doing the exact same thing.”Researchers from RTI International found that kids aged 12 to 17 experienced a 256 percent increase in exposure to ads touting e-cigs during the study period of 2011 to 2013. The exposure of young adults, those ages 18-24, increased by 321 percent.This Video Player Requires JavaScriptIt has come to our attention that the browser you are using is either not running javascript or out of date. Please enable javascript and/or update your browser if possible.Unlike traditional cigarettes, e-smoke advertising is not federally regulated. The cylindrical vaporizers weren’t around when the big tobacco companies regularly made headlines over their advertising tactics. But now, according to the researchers, marketers are using the power of the small screen to promote various brands, in a similar fashion to what was aired when tobacco was king.“We don’t know the extent to which an e-cigarette is really a gateway to other tobacco products."Today, though, more than 75 percent of e-cig ads were shown on cable networks, including AMC, Country Music Television, Comedy Central, WGN America, TV Land, and VH1. Researchers also found that e-cigarette ads appeared on programs like “The Bachelor,” “Big Brother,” and “Survivor,” all of which were among the 100 highest-rated youth programs for the 2012-2013 TV season. More than 80 percent of the ads were for a single brand, blu eCigs.To figure out just how pervasive e-cigarette TV ads were during the last few years, the researchers used a standard unit of TV exposure measurement called Target Rating Points, or TRPs. These points are measured for a specified audience as a function of an ad’s reach, basically the proportion of people exposed to an advertisement, as well as frequency, or the number of times an advertisement is potentially viewed.This Video Player Requires JavaScriptIt has come to our attention that the browser you are using is either not running javascript or out of date. Please enable javascript and/or update your browser if possible.The researchers used a common measurement to gauge how many people saw an e-cigarette, and how often they likely saw it. Based on that data, they estimated that 50.0 percent of all kids between the ages of 12 to 17 in U.S. TV households were exposed to an average of 21 e-cigarette ads from October 2012 through September 2013.They also say data could represent an exposure to an average of 105 advertisements for 10 percent of all U.S. youth or an exposure to an average of 13 ads for 80% of all U.S. youth over the 1-year period.Those numbers have researchers and other public health advocates worried.“We don’t know the extent to which an e-cigarette is really a gateway to other tobacco products,” explains lead researcher Dr. Jennifer Duke, senior public health analyst at RTI. “What we do know is that nicotine spurs changes in the brain that leads to addiction. And no one knows what the ramifications of e-cigarettes and potential addiction will be.”This Video Player Requires JavaScriptIt has come to our attention that the browser you are using is either not running javascript or out of date. Please enable javascript and/or update your browser if possible.Indeed, e-cigs are growing in popularity, with about $1 billion in sales as of August 2013. As of 2012, an estimated 1.8 million middle and high school students had ever used e-cigarettes, according to the researchers. With tobacco companies like Lorillard, which bought blu eCigs, entering into the mix, makers of e-cigs have gone Hollywood with celebrity endorsers like Jenny McCarthy and Stephen Dorff touting the benefits of blu, and punk queen Courtney Love plugging another brand called NJOYs.For doctors on the frontlines of treating and preventing disease among children and young adults, the prevalence of e-cig use among youth is one more battle they must fight to try and keep kids healthy.“This whole study is tremendously concerning to me,” says pediatrician Dr. Deb Lonzer of Cleveland Clinic Children’s. “Celebrities have enormous power and they are touting the benefits of smoking. I’m just a nerdy little pediatrician, how can I compete with some celebrity or the deep pockets of a tobacco company?”Neuroscientists now recognize that adolescent brains are still developing, and don’t reach full maturity until the early 20s. The last part of the brain to develop includes areas linked to impulse control and planning.“Just because a young person has a cell phone like an adult or holds down a job like an adult does not mean they are adults in terms of a mature brain,” Lonzer said. “That means they can’t make decisions like an adult and when they are exposed repeatedly to things that seem to be the social norm, trust me, they will try those things.”According to a report released by the anti-smoking organization Legacy, e-cig manufacturers spent $39 million in advertising from June through September 2013, much of it targeted to youth. Although some manufacturers would welcome regulation, they do dispute they target America’s young.“The products are being advertised to adults,” said Cynthia Cabrera, executive director of the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. “If children are watching during that time, it’s possible, but they are being marketed to adult consumers, to adult smokers.”NBC News' Maggie Fox contributed to this report.First published May 30 2014, 1:35 PMOriginal author: Luisa
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Viewing E-Cigarette Use May Keep Smokers From Quitting

[unable to retrieve full-text content]Title: Viewing E-Cigarette Use May Keep Smokers From Quitting Category: Health News Created: 5/29/2014 4:36:00 PM Last Editorial Review: 5/30/2014 12:00:00 AMOriginal author: Riley
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Nicotine – the basics

As key component of the vapor inhaled by consumers of electronic cigarettes, nicotine has raised controversy because of its alleged addictive potential and toxic effects. Therefore, I will briefly summarize the chemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of nicotine in the first post of this blog. Some important issues, such as toxicology or addiction/dependence will be discussed in detail later. Chemistry […]

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Nicotine – the basics

As key component of the vapor inhaled by consumers of electronic cigarettes, nicotine has raised controversy because of its alleged addictive potential and toxic effects. Therefore, I will briefly summarize the chemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of nicotine in the first post of this blog. Some important issues, such as toxicology or addiction/dependence will be discussed in detail later. Chemistry […]

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E-cigarette crackdown planned

STORY HIGHLIGHTSE-cigarettes deliver nicotine to the user as a vaporFDA has regulatory authority now only over cigarettes, smokeless tobaccoAge limit to buy e-cigarettes is expected to be 18 when rules are final(CNN) -- The Food and Drug Administration is making another attempt at regulating electronic cigarettes and other tobacco products.On Thursday, the agency proposed rules that call for strict regulation of electronic cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, water pipe tobacco and hookahs. Currently, only cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and roll-your-own tobacco come under the FDA's regulatory authority.When these recommendations are finalized following a 75-day public comment period, the age limit to buy the products is expected to be at least 18, although individual states could choose to set it higher.Health warnings would also be required, and the sale of the products in vending machines would be prohibited. Initially, the only health warning required for e-cigarettes would be about the potential for addiction to nicotine.Manufacturers would be required to register all their products and ingredients with the FDA. They would be able to market new products only after an FDA review, and they would need to provide scientific evidence before making any direct or implied claims of risk reduction associated with their product.Companies would also no longer be allowed to give out free samples.After the public comment period, and once the proposed rules are finalized, manufacturers will have 24 months to submit applications to allow their products to remain on the market or to submit new product applications.E-cigarettes deliver nicotine to the user as a vapor. They are usually battery-operated and come with a replaceable cartridge that contains liquid nicotine. When heated, the liquid in the cartridge turns into a vapor that's inhaled.Most look like cigarettes, cigars or pipes, but some resemble pens or USB memory sticks. Because they have not been fully studied, the FDA says it's unknown what health risks they pose, how much nicotine or other chemicals are actually being inhaled, or whether there is any benefit to using them.Last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the percentage of high school students who reported ever using an e-cigarette more than doubled in one year, from 4.7% to 10% between 2011 and 2012.As electronic cigarettes have increased in popularity, so have the number of related calls to poison control centers nationwide. According to a recent CDC report, poison control centers logged 215 calls involving e-cigarettes in February alone. Of those calls, 51% involved children."It's really the wild, wild West out there," said Margaret Hamburg, FDA commissioner. "Because e-cigarettes are increasingly in the marketplace. They're coming in different sizes, shapes and flavors in terms of the nicotine in them, and there's very worrisome data that show that young people in particular are starting to take up e-cigarettes, especially the flavored ones -- and that might be a gateway to other harmful tobacco products."Hamburg said officials don't know how many types are on the market, another reason why regulation is critical."We're already conducting research and working with partners in the research community to better understand patterns of use of these e-cigarettes and to learn more about the way in which they work and the delivery of the nicotine through e-cigarettes. But until we can really regulate them, we can't have all the information we need and we can't take all the actions that we might want to, to be able to best address the public health issues associated with them."Miguel Martin, president of LogicTechnology Development -- considered the second-largest electronic cigarette company in the U.S. -- said he is encouraged by the FDA announcement."We look forward to being a part of this process and believe that science-based and responsible regulations are good for both adult consumers and responsible electronic cigarette manufacturers," Martin said.Logic opened its doors in 2010. The company has nine products on the market, both disposable and rechargeable, but no flavored nicotine products. Logic implemented rules a year ago similar to the ones the FDA has proposed."We support and have already implemented those steps to ensure that adult smokers are the audience and consumer base of our products," Martin said. "We work with the retailers to ensure the product is sold to adult consumers of legal smoking age."Experts have said that e-cigarettes, if properly regulated, could help reduce the number of people who use conventional cigarettes and die of tobacco-related disease.But a lot of unanswered questions remain, according to Michael Eriksen, dean of the School of Public Health at Georgia State University, one of 14 U.S. institutions conducting FDA-funded research on electronic cigarettes.Nicotine is a drug, and poison experts say the concentrated liquid form used in e-cigarettes is highly toxic, even in small doses. It can be inhaled or absorbed through the skin."How concentrated is liquid nicotine? Are there impurities in it? Is it properly handled like a pesticide?" Eriksen asks. "Nicotine is a pesticide, fundamentally, and we take so many precautions about pesticides for our lawns and how to wear gloves. But what precautions do consumers take when they put the nicotine vials in? People treat it (liquid nicotine) as sugar when it's a toxin."Harold Wimmer, president and CEO of the American Lung Association, believes nicotine is highly addictive whether used in a regular cigarette or an e-cigarette.So how safe are e-cigarettes? Hamburg said it's buyer beware."We think that there's a lot of information that needs to be understood about e-cigarettes and their use. We're trying to help provide some of that information through research that we're conducting," she said."But we need the tools that regulation provides to be able to get critical new knowledge about e-cigarettes and to be able to put in place a framework that will protect the American public and potentially e-cigarette users, and really address the issues of what are the health consequences and what are the potential benefits."Hamburg believes these new rules will change the landscape.If the FDA broadens its authority to regulate tobacco products, she said, it will make a major contribution to the health of Americans. But big changes could come slowly."It may be years before much regulation is imposed," said Carl Tobias, a law professor at the University of Richmond. "The lobbying at FDA and Congress will be intense."And some believe the FDA has already waited too long."It is inexcusable that it has taken the FDA and the Administration so long to act," Matthew L. Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, said in a statement. "This delay has had serious public health consequences as these unregulated tobacco products have been marketed using tactics and sweet flavors that appeal to kids, and their use has skyrocketed."The FDA and the Administration must now move as quickly as possible to finalize this rule."0Comments »SHARE THISPrintEmailMore sharingRedditStumbleUponDeliciousOriginal author: James
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CanCigs Electronic Cigarettes Launches Brand New Wholesale Program for Canadian Retailers

[unable to retrieve full-text content]OTTAWA, Ontario, Canada, May 29, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Many electronic cigarette distributors across the globe are focusing on the wholesale market as more and more retailers begin to add electronic cigarettes to their current inventory. Electronic cigarettes are showing up on Mom...Original author: Margrett
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How the FDA plans to regulate e-cigarettes

By Quentin Fottrell Shutterstock.com / Leszek GlasnerThe FDA last month proposed new regulations to regulate e-cigarettes. It may want to pay special attention to the segment of the market known as “vaporizers.”As The Wall Street Journal points out, the fastest growing segment of the e-cigarette market is coming from customizable “vaporizers,’’ which have larger batteries and cartridges than regular e-cigarettes and can thus hold more liquid and last longer. They also allow users to refill cartridges with liquid bought in bulk. According to The Wall Street Journal article, Wells Fargo estimates vaporizers are growing twice as fast as regular e-cigarettes, approaching 50% of total e-cigarette sales.The FDA proposals — which also cover pipe tobacco, hookahs and cigars — will outlaw the sale of e-cigarettes to children and, like alcohol, require people to show identification to prove they are 18 years of age or older when they buy them. In the first such regulations for the e-cigarette industry, companies will also have to apply for FDA approval before marketing their products, which critics say vary wildly in quality; they also won’t be allowed to distribute free samples. The proposals will be open to public comment for 75 days and, experts say, will likely take at least a year to finalize.The FDA notes that e-cigarettes marketed with flavors “can be especially attractive to youth.” Earlier this month, a group of 11 Democratic members of Congress released a report that said e-cigarette flavors such as “Cherry Crush,” “Chocolate Treat” and “Peachy Keen” appeal to minors and should also be restricted. “From candy flavors to rock concert sponsorships, every single company surveyed in this report has employed a marketing strategy that appears to target youth,” Senator Richard J. Durbin, an Illinois Democrat, said in a statement. “E-cigarette makers are starting to prey on kids, just like the big tobacco companies,” added Henry J. Waxman, a Democrat from California.Click to Play E-cigarettes becoming regulated by FDAE-cigarettes now fall under the regulation of the FDA. What will the agency allow, and what will it not? And why not? How do e-cigarettes work? WSJ's Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer.Between 2011 and 2012, e-cigarette use nearly doubled from 0.6% to 1.1% among middle school students and from 1.5% to 2.8% among high school students, a 2013 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. Federal laws prohibit traditional cigarettes from being marketed to people under 18 years old, but there are no federal limits for e-cigarette makers. Roughly 28 states prohibit their sale to minors, and legislation is pending in several others. The Food and Drug Administration, meanwhile, has invited e-cigarette firms to cooperate with the agency on regulation. The FDA is also seeking research on whether e-cigarette users become dual users with traditional cigarettes.Unlike tobacco products, e-cigarettes carry no child-warning labels, but the FDA also proposes warnings related to packaging and advertisements. There’s been a “dramatic” increase in calls to poison centers related to e-cigarettes, according to a report released earlier this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The number of such calls rose from one a month in September 2010 to 215 a month in February 2014, the report said, while the number of calls each month involving conventional cigarettes did not show a similar increase during the same time period. “The liquid nicotine used in e-cigarettes can be hazardous,” CDC director Tom Frieden said in a statement.The American Lung Association, a non-profit organization in Washington, D.C., released a statement Thursday welcoming the FDA’s proposals, but urged the White House to finalize legislation by the end of the year. “The years of delay have allowed e-cigarette use among youth to double,” Harold Wimmer, national president and CEO of the American Lung Association, said in a statement, adding, “FDA must have basic authority over all tobacco products in order to protect public health and the health of our children.” He also urged the FDA to “regulate all tobacco products in the exact same manner.”One possible major blow for the e-cigarette industry: restrictions in advertising. “The e-cigarette industry does include historic big tobacco and has ripped some of its tactics from the tobacco industry’s playbook,” says Erika Sward, assistant vice president for national advocacy at the ALA, like glamorizing the product with celebrity endorsements that encourages people to switch to e-cigarettes rather than quitting nicotine. Recent e-cigarette commercials feature TV personality Jenny McCarthy and actor Stephen Dorff . Major tobacco companies Altria Group MO, Reynolds American RAI and Lorillard LO have all started producing e-cigarettes. The FDA has authority to issue further regulations to restrict online sales of all regulated tobacco products, an FDA spokesman says.Also see: 10 things e-cigarettes won’t tell youFor its part, the e-cigarette industry says it supports federal regulation — up to a point. The Smoke-Free Alternatives Trade Association, which represents the vapor products industry, backs proposals to restrict the sale of e-cigarette products to minors, and says it will support any effort made by legislative agencies and organizations to keep vaporizers out of the hands of underage consumers. But Cynthia Cabrera, executive director of the association, says e-cigarettes are markedly different from other tobacco products, and should not be classified as such. “These products do not contain tobacco, but may or may not contain nicotine derived from tobacco,” she says.Applying the Tobacco Control Act (2009) — which restricts the sale of tobacco cigarettes online and flavored cigarettes — in its totality to e-cigarettes would be a mistake, Cabrera says. “Big tobacco would inherit the space,” she says. “The majority of consumers switch from tobacco cigarettes because they have the opportunity to taste different flavors.” The industry should look at naming conventions, she adds. One e-cigarette company, Five Pawns, gives vapor flavors chess-inspired names like “Grandmaster” and “Queenside.” Flavors are an integral part of quitting and help people not return to smoking, says Carl V. Phillips, scientific director for The Consumer Advocates for Smoke-free Alternatives Association or CASAA.However, some studies maintain that vaporizers have carcinogenic properties, bolstering the case for the strictest possible regulation. Exposure to the nicotine vapor from e-cigarettes resulted in “strikingly similar” gene mutations in bronchial cells as those found in smokers, according to one study in January’s “ Clinical Cancer Research,” a journal published by the American Association for Cancer Research. Nicotine strength in e-cigarettes varies from zero to one or two packs of cigarettes in a single device, CASAA’s Phillips says. “You have however much you want and stop there,” he adds. Nicotine coupled with tobacco is far more dangerous than the “small amount” of nicotine in vaporizer products, Cabrera adds.And some experts say there’s not enough evidence to prove that e-cigarettes can cause cancer in people. “The world would be better off if nobody but scientists read studies like that,” says Phillips, who is also a former professor of public health at the University of Alberta, Canada. These are technical studies that should lead to further scientific analysis, he says, “which is eventually useful for what happens in the real world. Trying to take one of these laboratory events and translate it into policy is almost always a mistake.” A separate study published in “ BMC Public Health, ” published by BioMed Central, a scientific publisher in the U.K., found no evidence that e-cigarettes contain harmful contaminants.While e-cigarette makers contend that the rush to regulate the products could have a negative impact on an industry they regard as a healthier alternative to tobacco, the FDA has already found that e-cigarettes vary widely in reliability and quality, and didn’t always do what they said on the package. “The FDA found significant quality issues that indicate that quality control processes used to manufacture these products are substandard or nonexistent,” the agency’s consumer advice page states. Cartridges labeled “no nicotine” did contain nicotine, for instance, and three different e-cigarette cartridges with the same label emitted a markedly different amount of nicotine with each puff.This article has been updated from a previous version. Other articles by Quentin Fottrell:Diet soda may trim your lifespanCocaine use is going to potTreating hangovers is now a billion-dollar industryOriginal author: Cody
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E-Cigarette Legislation: Will the WHO lead us to better understanding of e-cigs?

In what could be a landmark moment for the electronic cigarette industry, 53 prominent health researchers have written to the World Health Organization (WHO) asking its members to “resist the urge to control and suppress e-cigarettes.”

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E-cigarettes could sweeten potential Reynolds-Lorillard deal

By Jilian Mincer NEW YORK (Reuters) - When Lorillard Inc bought the blu eCigs brand two years ago, the electronic cigarette had a 10 percent share of a tiny U.S. market, generating about $50 million in sales. It was available in only 12,000 retail outlets and over the Internet. Today, the U.S. tobacco company’s marketing and distribution muscle, including its use of frequent TV commercials and concert sponsorships, has taken blu into 149,000 outlets and driven its U.S. market share to about 47 percent. Annual sales have quadrupled to more than $200 million. The turbo-charged growth means that blu and Lorillard's British SKYCIG e-cigarette brand may be the assets with the sweetest potential for Reynolds American Inc as it holds talks over a deal to acquire its U.S. rival. Both brands would complement Reynolds' new Vuse e-cigarettes brand, due to go national this summer, and vault the combined company into an undisputed leadership position in the young market. And the gains in e-cigarette sales may have only just begun. Some Wall Street analysts see e-cigarettes and other “vapor products” overtaking traditional tobacco sales within six years. "Acquisition of Lorillard would give Reynolds a distinct advantage in the e-cig market," said Steve Marascia, Director of Research at Capitol Securities Management. Reuters reported last week that the companies were in late- stage talks that would combine the second and third-largest U.S. tobacco companies, according to people familiar with the matter. A combination of Lorillard and Reynolds, which is 42 percent owned by British American Tobacco, would create a formidable rival to Altria Group Inc, which owns the Marlboro brand and controls about 50 percent of the traditional cigarette market in the U.S. E-cigarettes are slim, reusable, metal tube devices containing nicotine-laced liquids that come in exotic flavors. When users puff, the nicotine is heated and released as a vapor containing no tar, unlike conventional cigarette smoke. Taking the lead position in e-cigarettes is appealing but given the market’s nascent nature, it is not a sure bet. New brands could easily grab market share, and there have been signs that other vaping products, including larger "tank"-based devices, may be gaining popularity. These products are typically less expensive to use, and can provide a stronger nicotine delivery. "I think it's more of a hedge," said Morningstar analyst Philip Gorham in reference to the e-cigarettes part of any Lorillard acquisition. "But if e-cigs take off, it will be the future, and they'll be glad they invested." MORE THAN MENTHOL Lorillard's popular Newport menthol cigarette brand, whose sales have held steady even as cigarette smoking in the United States has declined, is likely to be the immediate driver of any deal. Newport accounts for 37 percent of the U.S. menthol market and 12.5 percent of overall cigarette sales. U.S. sales of conventional cigarettes are forecast to drop to $15.3 billion in 2023 from $28.3 billion in 2013, according to a recent report from Wells Fargo Securities. In contrast, it sees revenue from e-cigarettes and other vapor devices growing to $24 billion by 2023 from $1.5 billion last year. Altria is also getting into the game, though it only introduced its MarkTen brand in August 2013 in Indiana. It plans a nationwide rollout next month. Lorillard bought blu two years ago from founder Jason Healy and his investors for $135 million. A year later, it paid $49 million for SKYCIG, now the leading e-cigarette in Britain. The deals were part of a strategy by Lorillard CEO Murray Kessler to expand its offerings beyond conventional cigarettes. Formerly at Altria, he helped build that company's Skoal and Copenhagen into two of the best-selling smokeless, or chewing tobacco, brands. Morningstar analyst Gorham estimates blu is currently worth $500 million to $1 billion, though it may account for a higher number in any deal for Lorillard, whose overall market value is currently about $22 billion. "Because Big Tobacco really wants a piece of the action, I could be low-balling it," he said. Since the vapor market is still in its early stages, it is difficult to anticipate how it may evolve. Regulatory changes could have a big impact. In April, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued proposed rules that would ban sale of e-cigarettes to anyone under 18 and require companies to list ingredients. But the rules so far would not restrict flavored products, online sales or advertising. The big tobacco companies are expected to be in a much better position than their dozens of smaller rivals to handle any new oversight thanks to their long experience dealing with regulators and battling anti-tobacco lawsuits. They may also have an upper hand in assuring quality control as the industry comes under stepped-up scrutiny after recent horror stories about the dangers of accidental poisoning from some ingredients on the market.   "The big three tobacco guys will be the big three e-cigarette companies because of their resources, relationship with distributors and ability to comply with the FDA faster than competitors," RBC Capital Markets LLC analyst Nik Modi said, referring to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (Reporting By Jilian Mincer; Editing by Martin Howell)Consumer DiscretionaryConsumer StaplesLorillard Incelectronic cigaretteReynolds American IncOriginal author: Halley
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E-cigarettes lose steam to vaporizers

Murray Kessler, Lorillard chief executive, told analysts during the company's April earnings call that the slowdown "is directly related to the rapid rise of vaporiser sales in vape shops".Read MoreBuzz kill: Feds lay down laws for e-cigarettesNik Modi, analyst at RBC Capital Markets, cited Google data showing US searches for "vape shop" have reached new highs every month this year, while queries for "electronic cigarette" have fallen back to 2009 levels. The pattern is similar in the UK, where e-cigarette sales are estimated at about £200m.Mr Kessler said vaporisers are growing faster than traditional e-cigarettes "because they deliver a superior consumer experience at a better value . . . bigger batteries, more vapour, more satisfaction, lower cost to refill".While new consumers may be comfortable starting with a traditional e-cigarette, those who stick with vaping may find the products are "somewhat lacking", said Andries Verleur, chief executive of VMR Products, which sells e-liquids, disposables and cartridge-based e-cigarettes.Read MorePassenger claims Air Canada let man 'vape' onboard"The large-scale devices solve this problem to an extent with the amount of liquid they can carry. You only need to charge and fill it once a week," Mr Verleur said.The ability to try a wide range of flavours and nicotine levels is also appealing, and liquids tend to be cheaper than e-cigarettes, widening the price gap with traditional cigarettes.Other market leaders have also taken notice. Njoy, backed by Sean Parker and Peter Thiel, has slipped from second to third place by US market share and said earlier this month it would add a refillable tank system to its product line-up in July and August. Mistic, another big brand, started selling a vaporiser in February.Read MoreIt's pot, it's smokeless—and it's publicly tradedAnalysts say such moves could push big tobacco to move more quickly into refillable systems. The two largest US cigarette makers, Altria and Reynolds American, are expanding their own cig-alike products nationally this year.Last month, Lorillard's Mr Kessler said the challenge is to "close the performance gap relative to vaporisers and do that in months, not years". The company is working on technical improvements, including battery strength, that he said "will minimise the defection from traditional e-cigs."Whether those changes will be enough to woo consumers is unclear. After a recent visit to a new vapour shop in New York, Ms Herzog wrote: "The cig-alike e-cigs as they are today are already becoming 'your father's e-cig'."—By Shannon Bond, Financial TimesOriginal author: Keitha
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Mouse, Rat & Cell Studies Don’t Make E-Cigarettes Carcinogenic

In determining what causes cancer in humans, epidemiologic and public health research is far superior to lab studies based on cells, mice or rats. While the latter can provide important information about the biology of cancer, the vast majority of carcinogens have been discovered in studies of human exposures. Although numerous epidemiologic studies prove that smokers are more likely to contract a variety of cancers, decades of research on cells and animals have failed to establish which of the thousands of toxins in cigarette smoke cause human lung, bladder or esophagus cancer. Of the two major components of e-cigarette juice, we know this: Nicotine, the subject of thousands of studies, has never been shown to be a cancer-causing agent, and propylene glycol is generally recognized as safe for human use by the FDA. Regrettably, these facts haven’t stopped some researchers from scaremongering about e-cigarettes. A study published in January (here) has led to a media frenzy suggesting that e-cigarette liquid may be as dangerous as smoke (here). This is nonsense. Normal cells do not live forever. But cancer cells are “immortalized” and are able to proliferate indefinitely. The experiments reported in this study were conducted in immortalized cell cultures, which also included mutations of two important genes: p53, an anticancer gene that is active in normal cells, was “silenced”; and k-ras, a well-characterized oncogene, was “activated.” The researchers were essentially using a cancer cell line. They measured the effect of two (unquantified) concentrations of nicotine e-cig solution and some sort of smoke extract on assays of growth and invasiveness after 10 days of exposure. Exposure of the cells to the low-nicotine e-cig solution and to the smoke extract had no effect on the invasiveness of the cells (a cancer trait). They reported, “We will next examine the effects of high nicotine conditioned media on cell invasion,” indicating a future experiment. The researchers noted that after 96 hours of exposure to e-cig solution, the cells showed changes in gene expression. This is not particularly newsworthy. Genes are the bits of DNA that tell cells what to do. At any given time cells have many thousands of active genes. Any environmental change can produce changes in the expression of large numbers of genes. In their effort to implicate nicotine, the researchers omitted information as to whether they had established appropriate experimental controls, such as exposure of the cells to other common agents such as caffeine or coffee extracts.Cellular and molecular research explores the incredibly complicated biology of cancer, but it is of limited value in identifying carcinogens. There are well established tests to determine if an agent is a possible mutagen, which is an indication that it might be cancer-causing. A 2007 study of American smokeless products was essentially negative (here), which is completely consistent with epidemiologic studies. It is likely that tests of e-cigarette liquids would produce similar results. Undistinguished research on smokeless tobacco products routinely generates headlines and soundbites best suited for the tabloids. From a public health standpoint, it is shameful that researchers and media conflate vague, exaggerated and highly theoretical claims about e-cigarette juice to the very real risks of cigarettes.Original author: James
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Call to Action! Rhode Island Bills Impose 80% Tax on E-Cigarettes and Unreasonable Requirements for Online Sales


Our mission is to ensure the availability of effective, affordable and reduced harm alternatives to smoking by increasing public awareness and education; to encourage the testing and development of products to achieve acceptable safety standards and reasonable regulation; and to promote the benefits of reduced harm alternatives.

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E-Cigarette Flavors: When will e-cig users be free to enjoy the tastes they desire?

This week, it was reported that the parent companies of brands such as Tootsie Roll, Thin Mints and Cinnamon Toast Crunch, among many others, are now presenting a fight to keep their names off e-cigarettes.

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